45th Annual Western Michigan University Archaeological Field School
Dates: June 25, 2020 - August 14, 2020
Organization: Western Michigan University and the City of Niles, Michigan
University Affiliation: Western Michigan University
Application Closing Date: March 20, 2020
Terrestrial: Yes
Underwater: No
State: Michigan
Description:

Western Michigan University will host its 45th annual archaeological field school in partnership with the City of Niles under the auspices of the Fort St. Joseph Archaeological Project, an award-winning, community-based research program aimed at investigating and interpreting the 18th century French trading post of Fort St. Joseph. Discovered in 1998, the site has yielded significant evidence of colonial life on the frontier of New France in the form of domestic, commercial, and religious artifacts; architectural remains and other features; and a well-preserved assemblage of plant and animal remains. Students receive training in site survey, excavation, data recovery, recordation, artifact identification, curation, community outreach, and public interpretation. In addition, enrolled students have the opportunity to assist in training middle/high school students and lifelong learners in archaeological techniques, thereby reinforcing their own learning. They also benefit from attending a public lecture series and participating in preparations for an archaeology open house in which they present their findings to a public audience of all ages. The 2020 field school will work to identify further architectural evidence at the Fort and search for other archaeological remains associated with fur trade activities in the region.

Registration in the field school is open to all University students in good standing. Students can earn 6 college credits for the cost of WMU tuition and a $500 course fee that covers transportation, equipment, and housing. Applications are available through Western Michigan University after January 6, 2020 at: https://wmich.edu/fortstjoseph/

For further information, please contact Michael S. Nassaney, nassaney@wmich.edu

Monticello – The Archaeology of Chesapeake Slavery and Landscape
Dates: June 1, 2020 - July 10, 2020
Organization: Monticello
University Affiliation: University of Virginia
Application Closing Date: April 6, 2020
Pdf External Web Site: https://www.monticello.org/fieldschool
Terrestrial: Yes
Underwater: No
State: Virginia
Description:

The Monticello-UVA Field School is an intensive six-week course in archaeological field and laboratory methods, offering six undergraduate or graduate credits through UVA's College of Arts and Sciences.

The Field School offers unique opportunities to:

  • Participate in the entire archaeological research process, including survey, excavation, field recording, artifact processing, and analysis.
  • Interact with and learn from collaborating scholars in a variety of fields including digital archaeology, archaeological data analysis, palynology, paleoethnobotany, zooarchaeology, geoarchaeology, dendrochronology, forest ecology, and history.
  • Contribute to cutting-edge interdisciplinary research into the lost world of Thomas Jefferson's Monticello Plantation

Monticello will offer succesful applications half-tuition scholarships. Since space is limited to twelve students plase be sure to have all application materials submitted by the deadline

The Undocumented Migration Project Historical Archaeology & Ethnography Arivaca, Arizona
Dates: May 24, 2020 - June 27, 2020
Organization: Institute for Field Research
University Affiliation: Institute for Field Research, Connecticut College, UCLA, University of Massachuset
Application Closing Date: April 3, 2020
Pdf External Web Site: https://ifrglobal.org/program/us-az-arivaca/
Terrestrial: Yes
Underwater: No
State: Arizona
Description:

Project Director: Dr. Haeden Stewart & Dr. Jason De León

Project Description:
The Undocumented Migration Project (UMP) is a long-term anthropological study of clandestine migration between Latin America and the United States that began in 2009. In the summer of 2020, we will expand this research through a multi-method study of the longer histories of migration, labor, and environmental transformations in Southern Arizona. Specifically, this study will take the form of an archaeological/ethnographic field school in the ghost mining town of Ruby, Arizona and the adjacent community of Arivaca, Arizona, an area located directly in the center of one of the busiest zones for undocumented crossings from Mexico into Arizona. In this field school, we will survey, excavate, and perform limited environmental tests on the remains of Ruby, Arizona, one of the first centers of industrial production, labor, and migration in Southern Arizona.  This archaeological study of Ruby will be combined with local interviews and oral histories with residents of Arivaca, concerning the early mining history of the region, the role of Ruby to local tourism, as well as towards local identity. Our research will investigate how the deep history of resource extraction, labor migration, colonial settlement, and border infrastructure have defined the border landscape over the past 150 years and continue to influence the life of locals in the area, as well as migrants who pass through.

Period(s) of Occupation: Ethnography, Contemporary & Historical Archaeology

Minimum Age: 18

Experience Required: No prior experience is required to participate in this field school.

Room and Board Arrangements:
Students and instructors will stay in the Arivaca Action Center, a multipurpose facility and community center that has been the base of operations for UMP field work since 2012. In this community center students will share unfurnished private rooms and should bring sleeping bags. The project will provide foam mattresses for all students to sleep on.

Academic Credit: 8 Semester Credits offered by Connecticut College. Tuition is $4,430. Scholarships available.

Contact Information: info@ifrglobal.org

Historical Archaeology & Heritage Management At A Japanese-American Confinement Camp Amache, Colorado
Dates: June 14, 2020 - July 18, 2020
Organization: Institute for Field Research
University Affiliation: Institute for Field Research, Connecticut College, University of Denver
Application Closing Date: April 3, 2020
Pdf External Web Site: https://ifrglobal.org/program/us-co-amache/
Terrestrial: Yes
Underwater: No
State: Colorado
Description:

Project Director: Dr. Bonnie Clark

Project Description:
The Amache Archaeology and Heritage Management Field School is part of a long-term community collaborative project at Amache, a World War II-era Japanese American confinement camp in southeastern Colorado. This project provides a rare opportunity for students to work with survivors in synergistic investigations of the past and its meaning in the present at a National Historic Landmark. Working on-site and in the Amache museum, participants in the field school, gain hands-on experience in intensive site survey, historic artifact analysis, ground penetrating radar, landscape archaeology, collections management, public interpretation and outreach, and community-based research.

Period(s) of Occupation: Historical, Community, Landscape Archaeology & Heritage Management

Minimum Age: 18

Experience Required: No prior experience is required to participate in this field school.

Room and Board Arrangements:
Amache is located near the town of Granada, a small farming community of around 500 residents where members of the field school are well known and welcomed. Students will be housed in the Amache Research Center (ARC), a facility located in and owned by the Town of Granada. A former school facility, the building has air conditioning, separate rooms for male and female students, multiple bathrooms, a locking shower room, a large kitchen, and several public use rooms. All meals will be communal and food for lunch and breakfast is provided in a serve yourself system. Evening meals will be prepared by a cook who can accommodate specific food needs or allergies. Students will have opportunities to purchase their own snacks and additional necessities either in the local convenience store or on trips to stores in nearby towns. Students will rotate through shared responsibilities for the maintenance of the ARC including setting up for meals, dish duty, and cleaning shared spaces.

Academic Credit: 8 Semester Credits  offered by Connecticut College. Tuition is $4,150. Scholarships available.

Contact Information: info@ifrglobal.org

Indigenous Collaborative Archaeology Mohegan Reservation, Connecticut
Dates: June 28, 2020 - July 29, 2020
Organization: Institute for Field Research
University Affiliation: Institute for Field Research, Connecticut College, Royal Ontario Museum, University of Toronto, Canada, Mohegan Tribe
Application Closing Date: April 3, 2020
Pdf External Web Site: https://ifrglobal.org/program/us-ct-mohegan/
Terrestrial: Yes
Underwater: No
State: Connecticut
Description:

Project Director: Dr. Craig N. Cipolla

Project Description:
The Mohegan field school studies colonial-era sites on the Mohegan Reservation in an innovative collaborative setting. The study of reservation households sheds new light on the rhythms and materiality of everyday life during tumultuous times while providing valuable perspectives on the long-term outcomes of colonial repression, survivance, interaction, and exchange. The field school brings together students and staff of diverse backgrounds to learn about colonial history, the history of North American archaeology, and—most importantly—the often-troubled relationship between archaeologists and indigenous communities. The field school runs as an equal partnership between the Tribe and an academic archaeologist.

Period(s) of Occupation: Indigenous, Historical, Community Archaeology

Minimum Age: 18

Experience Required: Prior experience is not required to participate in this program.

Room and Board Arrangements:
Students will live in modest student dormitories at Connecticut College. Students will have their own private bedrooms—including single beds, mattresses, and dressers along with access to a communal bathroom. Rooms are NOT air conditioned, so please bring (or plan to purchase) a window fan to keep your room cool. Students will have access to wireless internet while on campus (but please note that its quality has been variable over the last few years.) All meals are provided through the college cafeteria. Students eat breakfast and dinner in the cafeteria, and bag lunches are prepared for them Monday through Saturday (for the field). The cafeteria caters to most dietary restrictions, e.g., vegetarians, food allergy sufferers, but please let the director know if you have any special dietary requirements before you arrive. Meals are served 7 days a week (even on non-work days) except for July 4th. On that day, all students are responsible for arranging and purchasing their own meals.

Academic Credit: 8 Semester Credits offered by Connecticut College. Tuition is $3,195. Scholarships available.

Contact Information: info@ifrglobal.org

Indigenous Archaeology At The Grand Ronde Reservation Oregon
Dates: June 29, 2020 - August 8, 2020
Organization: Institute for Field Research
University Affiliation: University of Washington, Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde Community of Oregon, Connecticut College, and Institute for Field Research
Application Closing Date: April 3, 2020
Pdf External Web Site: https://ifrglobal.org/program/us-or-indigenous-archaeology/
Terrestrial: Yes
Underwater: No
State: Oregon
Description:

Project Director: Dr. Sara Gonzalez

Project Description:
Field Methods in Indigenous Archaeology is a community-based field school in tribal historic preservation and archaeological field methods on the Grand Ronde reservation in northwestern Oregon. Students will work alongside and with the Grand Ronde Tribal Historic Preservation Office (THPO) to document material histories associated with education and childhood on the Grand Ronde reservation from 1855 to the early 20th century. This summer we will be assisting the Historic Preservation Office in a survey of school sites on the reservation. The Grand Ronde Agency School is unique in regards to American Indian boarding schools, as it was under the control of the tribe and tribal members served as Principals and teachers. Work at the school thus presents an opportunity to remember the material dimensions of Grand Ronde survivance and what it has meant to grow up Grand Ronde. The field school offers field training in a variety archaeological, ethnographic, and community-based field methods. Students will learn a variety of low-impact archaeological techniques for documenting tribal cultural resources including high-precision remote sensing, survey, and mapping technologies; excavation strategies; and digital storytelling and 3D modeling (photogrammetry & RTI) techniques for preserving and analyzing tribal belongings. Lectures, field trips to ancestral sites, workshops, and public outreach events will complement these essential skills and present further opportunities for students to understand the principles of tribal historic preservation and archaeological practice as they are applied by the Grand Ronde tribal nation.

Period(s) of Occupation: Indigenous, Historical, Community Archaeology

Minimum Age: 18

Experience Required: None.

Room and Board Arrangements:
During the on-site portion of the field school, we will camp together at the Grand Ronde Reservation’s Uxyat powwow grounds. On some weekends we may be asked to relocate to the Big Buck campground, also on the reservation. We will keep you apprised of these moves. The Powwow grounds feature bathroom and shower facilities as well as WiFi access, running water, and power access in camp. Students have the option of sharing a tent provided by the project and/or bringing their own tent with them. The project does not have the capacity to provide students with additional camping gear (e.g., sleeping bag, sleeping pad, camp chair, personal lantern/headlamp, etc.) though students may contact the director to determine whether anyone has additional equipment they are willing to share. Meals (breakfast, lunch and dinner) will be provided for us by the Grand Ronde Food & Nutrition program from Monday breakfast through Friday lunch. Snacks and a camp kitchen will be provided for students outside of these hours for their own meal preparation and snacking needs. Please contact the director, Dr. Sara Gonzalez, with any food allergies you may have. The kitchens are able to accommodate a variety of food needs (vegetarian, gluten-free, dairy and/or nut allergies), but please contact the field director, Dr. Sara Gonzalez, to ensure your need may be accommodated by the kitchens

Academic Credit: 8 semester credit units from Connecticut College. Tuition is $4,445. Scholarships available.

Contact Information: info@ifrglobal.org

University of the South Field School
Dates: May 25, 2020 - June 27, 2020
Organization: South Cumberland State Park and the University of the South
University Affiliation: University of the South
Application Closing Date: May 1, 2020
Terrestrial: Yes
Underwater: No
State: Tennessee
Description:
The University of the South will be conducting an archaeological field school at the site of a late 19th century private prison in southern Middle Tennessee. The prison was used from 1872 until 1896 to house primarily African American convicts who had been leased from the state penitentiary by wealthy white industrialists. The convicts were forced to work in dangerous coal mines and at coke ovens without pay in a system scholars have referred to as “slavery by another name”. We aim to use archaeology to document the living conditions inside the prison, including architecture, spatial use, and material remains.This research is the first of its kind of be carried out in Tennessee and has the potential to rewrite our understandings of labor relations, racial relations, and industrialization in the American Upland South immediately following the Civil War.
 
The University of the South offers 6 undergraduate credit hours for ANTH357: Field Methods in Archaeology. Students will learn archaeological excavation methods, laboratory techniques, basic artifact identification, and basic archival research methods. The cost of the field school is $3,000, which includes tuition, fees, housing, meals, and field trips for the duration of the field school. The field school runs from May 25th until June 27th.
 
For more information, please contact Camille Westmont (vcwestmo@sewanee.edu).
Military and Diaspora Archaeology in Southern Illinois
Dates: May 18, 2020 - June 26, 2020
Organization: SIUC Anthropology Department
University Affiliation: Southern Illinois University Carbondale
Application Closing Date: May 15, 2020
Pdf External Web Site: http://cola.siu.edu/anthro/undergraduate/field-school/
Terrestrial: Yes
Underwater: No
State: Illinois
Description:

The first half of the 2020 SIUC archaeology field school will be held at two historic period fort sites—Ft. Kaskaskia, a French colonial (1734-1765) fort and the Garrison Hill site, which represents the remains of a short-lived American (1802-1807) fort of the same name that played a crucial role in the formation of the Lewis and Clark Expedition. Both fort sites (especially Garrison Hill, which was only discovered in 2017) are almost completely unknown from an archaeological perspective. Consequently, the 2020 field investigations will concentrate on delimiting the boundaries of and locating structures, cellars, and other features at both sites through a combination of remote sensing technologies and hand excavations. Students will receive “hands on” instruction in the use of ground penetrating radar (GPR), gradiometers, drones, and GPS mapping equipment to search for subsurface features and create detailed maps of the two forts. Hand excavations will concentrate on investigating French and American colonial period features discovered outside the walls of Ft. Kaskaskia last summer as well as further investigation of the French barracks. Investigations at the Garrison Hill site have as their goal the recovery of artefactual and food remains associated with the US Army garrison at that site, from which Lewis and Clark recruited 12 of their expedition members.

The second half of the field school will involve the use of the same technologies and methods to investigate the Miller Grove site, a freed slave African-American settlement established in the 1840s comprised of over 20 households, a church/school, and a cemetery that now exists entirely as an archaeological site on the Shawnee National Forest of southern Illinois. Oral histories collected from community descendants indicate that the community played a pivotal role in helping runaway slaves on their dangerous journey through southern Illinois, an area occupied by white settlers who were largely pro-southern and pro-slavery in their outlook. The field school will investigate one or more households to recover faunal remains and artifacts that can provide information on the daily lives of this largely “silenced” community as well as possibly conducting GPR and gradiometer investigations of the church/school and cemetery.

About the Field School

            Southern Illinois University (SIU) is located in Carbondale, Illinois, a town of approximately 25,000 people. Students will travel from the Center for Archaeological Investigations (CAI) curation center each day in university provided vans to the two sites, both of which are located approximately an hour from Carbondale. During the field school, we will take field trips to both historic and prehistoric period sites and events located in the vicinities of Ft. Kaskaskia and Miller Grove including the annual Ft. de Chartres “Rendezvous” of period re-enactors that is held the first week in June every year. Field school students will be involved in public outreach activities at both sites including working with Native American and African-American youth and members of the general public. Field school students should have completed at least one year of college but no previous field experience is required.

            Housing is available at the dormitories on the SIUC campus ($20 a night) or at Touch of Nature ($9-11 a night) an environmental facility with cabins operated by SIUC. Touch of Nature (TON) is similar in appearance to a summer camp with woods, lake, deer, and other animals. Meals are available at TON for an additional charge. Students who stay at TON also will need to have their own car as it is located about a 15-minute drive from the main SIUC campus. SIUC has a grant from the Lewis and Clark Trail Heritage Foundation that can be used to pay for part or all of the housing costs, depending on the number of students that apply who need such housing.

Credits: 6 (Anthropology) at SIU Carbondale

Costs: $2,241.80, which includes all required fees.

For more information including how to apply, please visit the SIUC archaeology field school web page at http://cola.siu.edu/anthro/undergraduate/field-school/. Additional information regarding the Center for Archaeological Investigations (CAI) at SIUC including photos and information regarding last year’s field school can be found on the SIU-CAI Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/centerforarchaeologicalinvestigations.

You can also contact the field school Director (Dr. Mark Wagner) directly for information at mjwagner@siu.edu, telephone: 618-453-5031

2020 Field School in Industrial Heritage and Archaeology at Michigan Technological University
Dates: May 11, 2020 - June 25, 2020
Organization: Michigan Technological University
University Affiliation: Michigan Technological University
Application Closing Date: April 15, 2020
Pdf External Web Site: https://www.mtu.edu/social-sciences/undergraduate/field-school/
Terrestrial: Yes
Underwater: No
State: Michigan
Description:

The 2020 field season will allow student teams to design and implement a series of surveys and assessments at exciting locations in Michigan's Keweenaw Peninsula. The surveys will examine historic places damaged by terrible floods in 2018, where landscape repair and improvement projects might damage archaeological resources—a classic scenario in cultural resources or heritage management careers—in the context of “public” archaeology. Students will have the opportunity to collect remote sensing and digital survey data for different landscapes and sites, help to design strategies for (and complete excavation of) potential sites, and analyze the results to yield recommendations on how to move forward. At the same time, the research team will share the research with communities, using both "face-to-face" and social media interactions. The final site selections will occur in during the spring, working in collaboration with partners at Fort Wilkins State Park, The Keweenaw National Historical Park Advisory Commission, the Keweenaw Land Trust, and other agencies and landowners. 

This summer, students will:
  • Survey and excavate potential sites of ancient and early industrial-era life in the Keweenaw, working at sites on Mont Ripley and Fort Wilkins, historic cemeteries in the area, as well as other sites.
  • Use Ground Penetrating Radar, LiDAR, and other pedestrian- and aerial ROV-based remote sensing and survey tools for visualization and analysis in a Geographic Information System (GIS) data structure.
  • Assist in research design, mapping, documenting, and excavating features in order to provide guidance to agencies and landowners on the legal and ethical management of cultural resources.
  • learn practical archaeological skills which may include: interpreting soils/sediments/stratigraphy, survey and landscape visualization, survey design, phase I and II site assessment, artifact analysis, and site formation processes.

Registration in the field school is open to any regular or guest student. Students can earn 3-9 college credits of undergraduate or graduate credits. Applications are available at: https://www.mtu.edu/social-sciences/undergraduate/field-school/

For further information, please contact Timothy Scarlett, scarlett@mtu.edu or (906) 487-2359.

Field Schools in Australia/New Zealand

Harrietville Chinese Mining Village Season 3
Dates: September 28, 2020 - October 24, 2020
Organization: The Uncovered Past Institute
Pdf External Web Site: https://www.uncoveredpast.org.au/harrietville-chinese-mining-village-season3-dig-with-us-2020
Terrestrial: Yes
Underwater: No
Description:

Join us to discover more about the Chinese miners who once lived and worked in the 19th century Harrietville Chinese Mining Village. For around fifty years from the early 1860s Harrietville was home to many of the thousands of Victoria’s Chinese gold miners. This will be the third season of archaeological excavation at the Chinese Mining Village, following the successful first and second seasons in October 2017 and October 2019. The largely undisturbed site includes mine workings, water races, building foundations, and gardens: a rare survivor of the heyday of Chinese gold mining in Victoria. The foundations of at least 19 buildings were discovered during a survey undertaken during Season One fieldwork in 2017. Huge quantities of food, liquor, medicines, utensils, ceramics and even coins were imported from China for the Chinese mining communities. Many fragments of these were discovered during the first two excavation seasons in 2017 and 2019, along with fragments of European tableware ceramics and glass bottles. Season Three research objectives will be to undertake more extensive excavations on a variety of building sites and gain a greater understanding of the lifestyle of the Chinese miners.

Location

In the Alpine National Park, in the Upper Ovens Valley, in northeast Victoria, Australia, near the town of Harrietville.

Dates

• The excavations are taking place over four weeks from Monday 28 September to Saturday 24 October 2020.
• Each week will be a 6-day program - starting Monday morning, finishing Saturday evening

• Week 1 - Monday 28 September to Saturday 3 October
• Week 2 - Monday 5 October to Saturday 10 October
• Week 3 - Monday 12 October to Saturday 17 October
• Week 4 - Monday 19 October to Saturday 24 October

You can take part for one, two, three, or all four of these weeks.
You can start in Weeks 1, 2, 3 or 4 - there will be introductory training each Monday for new participants.

Bookings

To register to participate in this dig, complete the Register Now registration form
• A non-refundable deposit of $350 is required to secure your place.
• Balance is to be paid by 14 August 2020.
• All fees are GST-exempt.

Cost

Full rate
• $1830 for 1 week
• $1730 for each subsequent week
Student rate
• $1115 for 1 week
• $1015 for each subsequent week
Residents of Alpine Shire
• $1115 for 1 week
• $1015 for each subsequent week

• Prices include program activities and training, heritage tours, lunches and morning/afternoon teas, and a shared BBQ dinner on Saturday evening each week.
• We will provide all equipment you will need to participate in the dig.
• Not included: accommodation, breakfast (or dinner except for Saturday evening each week).
• All rates are in Australian dollars.

Member discounts

Members of The Uncovered Past Institute are entitled to dig fee discounts:
• Associate Members receive a $50 discount off their first week's fee.
• Full Members receive a $50 discount off each week's fee.

For membership rates, see Support Us

Students

• All students enrolled in tertiary and secondary education institutions are eligible for the ‘Student Rate
• You do not need to be an archaeology student to qualify for the student discount. 
• All participants under the age of 18 need to be accompanied by another participant who is aged 18 or more.
• All students will need to provide proof of their enrolment.
• Archaeology students may also be entitled to course credits for participation in this dig, depending on their institution's fieldwork accreditation requirements. Please enquire for more details.

Highlights

• Learn excavation techniques
• Work alongside some of the most experienced archaeologists and historians of Chinese heritage, and mining heritage, in Australia.
• Learn how to identify Chinese and European artefacts such as ceramics, coins, bottles, foodstuffs and beverages, medicines and opium- and tobacco- smoking paraphernalia.
• Be a part of archaeological discovery in one of the key heritage areas of 19th century Chinese mining history.

Program

The program includes:
• intensive training, and participation in, field work (site excavation, site surveying), and artefact processing (cleaning, recording, identifying and cataloguing)
• a maximum of 4 participants for every supervising archaeologist in our team
• guided history and heritage tours of Harrietville and surrounding areas - focusing on mining history and the Chinese pioneers of the Valley.
• workshops and lectures, on topics such as:

Principles of archaeology
Surveying techniques, mapping and GIS
Conservation techniques for materials
Chinese ceramics
Chinese coins
Alluvial mining techniques
Chinese pioneers of the Ovens Valley
Chinese mining history in Australia
Understanding Chinese joss houses and temples
Goldrush-era Chinese cooking and food preservation

Who For?

Any one interested in learning more about archaeology and history is welcome to take part. No previous experience in archaeology is required. A minimum age of 18 years old is required for individual participants. People aged 12-17 can also take part if accompanied by a responsible adult.

Activity Level

Archaeological fieldwork requires a general level of fitness and involves physical exertion. Processing artefacts by contrast is mainly a seated activity. Fieldwork involves walking a short distance to reach the site, lifting buckets of dirt, kneeling on the ground for extended periods. You will work at your own pace, but the experience will be more enjoyable if you are in good physical condition. If you do not exercise regularly, you might improve your conditioning by taking consecutively longer walks at home before the program begins.

If you prefer to be mainly seated, then the activity schedule can be tailored individually for you, to allow you to focus on processing artefacts. If you have any questions or concerns about your ability to participate in this program, please contact us to discuss this further.

Accommodation options

We have booked some low-cost share-house accommodation in Harrietville. The costs for this are: 
• $50 per person per night for a Queen Bed or Double Bed in a room to yourself
• $30 per person per night for a Double Bunk Bed in a room sharing with others
• $25 per person per night for a Single Bunk Bed in a room sharing with others.

You can register your interest in this when you pay your deposit.

If you would prefer instead to book your own accommodation, the dig site is close to a wide range of accommodation options in Harrietville and also nearby Bright (15 min drive from Harrietville): camping grounds, caravan parks, B&Bs, motels, hotels and chalets. The Ovens Valley is a popular spring tourism destination, so it is advisable to book your accommodation early.

Weather Conditions

Harrietville in October is in the middle of spring, with mild weather. Temperatures range from average of 21°C maximum to 6°C overnight minimum. 

Other activities available in the Ovens Valley

The Ovens Valley is situated in the foothills of the Australian Alps, with a wide variety of recreational activities which participants can enjoy before or after the dig period, or during the Sunday free day at the end of each week. Walking, hiking, rail-trail, mountain biking, kayaking and canoeing, wineries, heritage towns and museums are just some of these - see www.visitbright.com.au for more information.

Getting There

Car: Harrietville is 4 hours drive from Melbourne, or 7 hours from Sydney.
Public transport: VLine operates a train and bus service from Melbourne to Bright via Wangaratta - see www.ptv.vic.gov.au/timetables and search for 'Vline Train' to 'Bright'
Bicycle: The Murray to Mountains Rail Trail runs from Wangaratta to Bright.
Bright to Harrietville:  is a 15 minute drive. For those arriving without cars we will arrange shuttle transport to Harrietville if required. Please enquire for details.
The dig site: is a 15 minute walk from Harrietville. A daily car shuttle, from Harrietville and from Bright, will also be arranged if some participants require it.

Bookings and Enquiries

Enquiries

Contact:  Paul Macgregor, phone: 03 5797 0155 (International +613 5797 0155) 
Email: uncoveredpastinstitute@gmail.com

Bookings

To register to participate in this dig, complete the Register Now registration form
• A non-refundable deposit of $350 is required to secure your place.
• Balance is to be paid by 14 August 2020, but can be paid earlier if you like.
• All fees are GST-exempt.

Cancellation policy

• Half of full fee is forfeited if booking is cancelled between 15 August and 13 September 2020 inclusive.
• Full fee is forfeited if booking is cancelled after 13 September 2020.
• In the unlikely event that the dig is cancelled by us (e.g. extreme weather forecast), you will receive a full refund of any monies paid, or you will be given the option to transfer your payment towards participation in another dig run by The Uncovered Past Institute.

Field Schools in Central America

Contact, Colonialism, & Ritual, Mexico: Oaxaca Linguistic Anthro & Historical Arch
Dates: June 14, 2020 - July 11, 2020
Organization: Institute for Field Research Field Schools
University Affiliation: California State University Los Angeles, Connecticut College, UCLA, Institute for Field Research
Application Closing Date: April 3, 2020
Pdf External Web Site: https://ifrglobal.org/program/mexico-pacific-rim/
Terrestrial: Yes
Underwater: No
Description:

Project Director: Dr. Aaron Sonnenschein, Dr. John M.D. Pohl, and Dr. Danny Zborover

The role of the Pacific Ocean is taking on increasing importance in Pre-Columbian, Colonial, and Contemporary studies of the Indigenous peoples of the Americas. Our project focuses on a key region within this vast system— the southern Mexican state of Oaxaca and its adjacent Pacific Coast— one of the most ethnically and linguistically complex and biologically diverse regions in the world. For over two millennia Oaxacan Indigenous cultures constructed here monumental sites; ruled over vast city-states; invented complex writing systems and iconography; and crafted among the finest artistic traditions in the world, some of which are still perpetuated to this day. The clash of the Indigenous and the European worlds in the 16th century created unique cultures; the legacy of which underlies the modern nation of Mexico. By traveling from the bustling Oaxaca City through the valleys, mountains, and down to the Pacific Coast, students will be introduced to a dynamic arena where long-term colonial interests were negotiated between Indigenous and European powers such as the Zapotecs, Mixtecs, Aztecs, Pochutecs, Chontal, Huaves, Spanish and, even English, Dutch, and French Pirates! Students will conduct interactive exercises in ceremonial centers and off-the-beaten track archaeological sites and museums, learn to decipher and employ Indigenous pictorial documents and European maps, experience urban and rural lifestyles in various geographical zones, visit sacred sites where rituals are still being performed today, conduct basic language documentation and investigate local language revitalization projects, and actively participate in local festivities. Finally, through the study of long-term colonial processes in southern Mexico, students will gain a better understanding of this fascinating modern nation-state and its direct impact on contemporary debates.

Please note that in compliance with Mexican policies, this field school does not involve an active participation in an archaeological excavation. All data resulting from this project are historical, ethnographic, and linguistic in nature, intended to be integrated with published and observed archaeological records.

Period(s) of Occupation: Ethnography, Linguistic Anthropology, Historical Archaeology

Minimum Age: 18

Experience Required: No experience required.

Room and Board Arrangements:
Students will be staying in hotels, local inns, and with host families while traveling through the different regions of Oaxaca and the Pacific Coast. All students will be sharing a room based on room size and availability. In Huamelula, students will be sleeping on inflatable beds and/or hammocks. Oaxacan food is a wonderful blend of Indigenous and European cuisines, and dining is a cultural experience in itself. Breakfasts and dinners are usually taken in local restaurants and diners, and light lunches in the field mostly consist of sandwiches. Specialized diets (vegan, kosher, etc.) are difficult to maintain, and vegetarians might find options fairly limited. Breakfast, lunch, and dinner are provided by the program 6 days a week. Students are responsible for their meals on free days each weekend.

Academic Credit: 8 Semester Credits offered by Connecticut College. Tuition is $4,640. Scholarships available.

Contact Information: info@ifrglobal.org

Historical Archaeology & Colonialism On Providence Island, Colombia
Dates: June 29, 2020 - July 27, 2020
Organization: Institute for Field Research
University Affiliation: University of Southern California, Connecticut College, Institute for Field Research
Application Closing Date: April 3, 2020
Pdf External Web Site: https://ifrglobal.org/program/colombia-providence-island/
Terrestrial: Yes
Underwater: No
Description:

Project Director: Dr. Tracie Mayfield

Project Description:
English settlers colonized Providence Island in 1629 one year after the founding of the Massachusetts Bay Colony in what was to become the United States, but the two colonies ultimately had very different historical trajectories. From 1629-1630, colonists, under the direction of the Providence Island Company, constructed a town, New Westminster, and several forts. Before the Spanish captured the colony in 1641, Providence Island was home to English indentured servants, African slaves sold or taken from Dutch and Spanish ships, Miskito Indians from the Spanish Main, Pequot Indians from Massachusetts, and English and Dutch pirates. Many of the original inhabitants stayed on the Island and their descendants continue to live and work on Providence to this day.

Around 1836, it became clear that the Island would not have enough agricultural productivity to sustain the population. Thus, as an economic supplement, the London-based directors of the Providence Island Company approved the conduct of piracy against Spanish ships and mainland settlements. In the 1670s (after the Spanish left), Providence became a base for English pirates, including the infamous Henry Morgan. Shortly after Colombian independence (1810), Colombia and Nicaragua both attempted claims on the Island territory. The issue was settled by treaty in 1928, officially ceding Providence, and its neighbor Island, San Andrés, to Colombia.
Providence Island’s Puritan original settlement –and subsequent population movement from flat coastal areas into the mountainous interior over the past 490 years– is completely unknown archaeologically, though extensive historical and documentary records exist. The 2020 field season centers on historical archaeology and cultural ethnography on Old Providence and Santa Catalina Islands with the goal of investigating the material, temporal, historical, and spatial aspects of the interactions on these small, yet highly multicultural, western Caribbean islands.

Period(s) of Occupation: Historical Archaeology, Ethnography

Minimum Age: 18

Experience Required: No prior experience required.

Room and Board Arrangements:
Students and faculty will be housed at Posada Enilda Bed and Breakfast located in the south of the Island in an area called Bottom House. Students do not need to reserve their own rooms, this will already be taken care of before they arrive. This posada is a fully modern facility with comfortable outdoor seating areas, shared dining room, and other amenities, such as air-conditioning, in-room safes, and personal refrigerators, and is extremely comfortable. The husband and wife owners are excited about hosting the students and we have enjoyed our stays in past years, immensely. Security cameras monitor the grounds and the main gate is locked at night. Providence is a safe island, with little serious crime. The owners of Posada Enilda will provide breakfast, every day, and lunch, Monday through Saturday, which will be served in the field or in the dining area at Posada Enilda. Dinners (and lunches on Sundays) will not be provided by the Project, butPosada Enilda offers $5.00 (USD) dinner specials every evening (a meat or meatless choice), which you can order at breakfast. Alternatively, you can choose from the regular menu served at the Posada and there are restaurants and grocery stores are available on the Island where students can purchase meals. In past years, students have gone in together to buy a crock-pot and took turns making dinners, as well. Food borne illness will be minimized by drinking only bottled water, which will be provided at the Posada so students can fill their bottles, multiple times every day. The owners of the Posada can meet most dietary needs (vegetarians, vegans, and lactose intolerant), other than Kosher.

Academic Credit: 8 Semester Credits credits offered by Connecticut College. Tuition is $4,630. Scholarships available.

Contact Information: info@ifrglobal.org

Field Schools in Europe

Balkan Heritage Field Schools
Organization: Balkan Heritage Foundation
University Affiliation: Connecticut College, USA; Queen's University, Canada; New Bulgarian University, Bulgaria
Terrestrial: Yes
Underwater: Yes
Description:
Name: Balkan Heritage Field Schools
Dates: May - Sept 2020
Organization: Balkan Heritage Foundation
University Affiliation:  Connecticut College, USA; Queen's University, Canada;  New Bulgarian University, Bulgaria.
Application Closing Date: various
Terrestrial: Yes
Underwater: Yes
Description: 
Join projects exploring diverse sites from Pre-History, Graeco-Roman Antiquity and the Middle Ages at locations across the Balkans. Learn fieldwork, drawing, sketching, photography , and photogrammetry and RTI techniques.  

Or, take part in a conservation workshop and get hands-on experience in Ancient Greek Pottery, Ancient Roman Pottery & Glass, Roman Mosaics, and Historic Paper, Textiles and Metal while enjoying locations in Bulgaria, Greece and N. Macedonia.  

And, our 'Fresco-Hunting' photo expedition will again be documenting medieval churches in Bulgaria & Serbia.

Also coming these season, prehistoric excavation projects on Neanderthals and Early Pottery Neolithic from the Holy Lands.  Watch our site for details.  
 
Skibbereen, Ireland: The Archaeology of Ireland’s Early Modern Period
Dates: May 24, 2020 - June 27, 2020
University Affiliation: University of Maryland
Application Closing Date: March 1, 2020
Pdf External Web Site: https://globalmaryland.umd.edu/offices/education-abroad/program/11224
Terrestrial: Yes
Underwater: No
Description:
Skibbereen, Ireland: The Archaeology of Ireland's Early Modern Period
 
Dates: May 24, 2020 - June 27, 2019
University Affiliation: University of Maryland
Application Closing Date: March 1, 2020
Terrestrial: Yes
Underwater: No
Description:
The Archaeology of Modern Ireland field school will take place in Skibbereen, County Cork, Ireland, from May 24 to June 27, 2020. Applications are due by March 1, 2020.
 
The Archaeology of Modern Ireland Field School explores the material history of the Irish Diaspora in and around Skibbereen, County Cork, an area that is infamous as a metaphor for the impacts and horrific sufferings of the Great Starvation. Through archaeological investigations, archival research, and interviews with local historians of the Skibbereen Heritage Center and members of the local community, students will receive extensive and intensive experience learning about the Irish Diaspora, socio-cultural change in Ireland over time, and the experience of Irish immigrants internationally.

This summer's Applied Field Program will explore the material history of the Irish Diaspora in County Cork. The location of the study is the area around Skibbereen, County Cork. Skibbereen is located 51 miles (82 km) southwest of Cork City. It became infamous as a metaphor for the impacts and horrific sufferings of the Great Starvation. Skibbereen is ideal due to its commitment to collecting Ireland's rich heritage. The Skibbereen Heritage Centre is a natural conduit between the archaeologist and the local community.

This research is an important move forward in modeling the diversity of material identities in Ireland and creating a database that will be significant not only to Ireland, but also to understanding material and social continuity and change in Irish diasporic communities worldwide.

Students will earn 6 credits for participating. Students will be in the field daily and no experience necessary. It is a excellent way to learn about Irish history, culture, and heritage.

For more information or to apply, visit UMD Education abroad. For photos of past field schools, see the project's Facebook page. If you have any questions, please contact Dr. Stephen Brighton at sbrighto@umd.edu

Bioarchaeology At 15th-16th Cent. Muslim & Christian Cemetery Lisbon, Portugal
Dates: June 14, 2020 - July 11, 2020
Organization: Institute for Field Research Field Schools
University Affiliation: ERA Arqueologia, University of Coimbra, Interdisciplinary Center for Archaeology and Evolution of Human Behavior (ICArEHB) at the University of Algarve, Institute for Field Research, Connecticut College
Application Closing Date: April 3, 2020
Pdf External Web Site: https://ifrglobal.org/program/portugal-necropolis/
Terrestrial: Yes
Underwater: No
Description:

Project Director: Dr. Lucy Evangelista & Ms. Marina Lourenço

Archaeological excavation within historic cities often produce deep stratigraphy dating back to the original foundation of the city and telling the story of its history. Following construction works at 74, Rua dos Lagares, the very heart of Old Lisbon, rescue archaeological excavations exposed an area with multiple, well preserved burials dating to the 15th-16th Centuries CE (Late Medieval/Modern period. This area was used as a necropolis in two different time periods. First (necropolis I), it was a Christian (and possibly Jewish burial site), vandalized in 1497. Later, the area was used as a Muslim and Christian cemetery dated to the 16th century CE.

Bioarcheology give us the tools to derive valuable cultural information from human remains. We can estimate age and sex, explore health conditions and may work and other physical activity patterns. It also provides the base for other studies like DNA or stable isotope studies that provide information about mobility and dietary and reconstructions. Combing the anatomical information with the contextual information recovered during excavations allow us to better understand how population’s attitudes and customs regarding death, funerary practices and body treatments changed throughout time.

Students will participate in the laboratory research phase of this collection. There will be no excavations. This field school is a classical post-excavation analysis program that strongly emphasize meticulous study of human remains both of their anatomy and their archaeological context. Through field trips around medieval Lisbon, lectures and lab work, students will complete this field school with an overall understanding of how bioarcheology research is a valuable tool in the understanding of past populations from a cultural, political or environmental point of view.

Period(s) of Occupation: Late Medieval/Modern period

Minimum Age: 18

Experience Required: No prior experience is required to participate in this field school.

Room and Board Arrangements:
During the program students will be lodged at a rented house in Lisbon, where they may share a room with other students (up to 2 per room). The house will be cleaned twice a week. It is the students’ responsibility to maintain the house clean for the rest of the week. Lunch will be provided by ERA at a local restaurant or at the canteen of School of Human Kinetics, near ERA’s installations. Daily breakfast and dinner and weekend meals will be the responsibility of each student. Students will be driven to local supermarkets twice a week.

Academic Credit: 8 semester credits offered by Connecticut College. Tuition is $3,960. Scholarships available.

Contact Information: info@ifrglobal.org

Underwater Archaeology In The Black Sea 2020
Dates: May 23, 2020 - June 18, 2020
Organization: Balkan Heritage Field School/Institute For Field Research
University Affiliation: Balkan Heritage Foundation (BHF) in collaboration with National Center for Underwater Archaeology (CUA), Bulgaria, Institute for Field Research, USA and New Bulgarian University.
Application Closing Date: April 3, 2020
Pdf External Web Site: https://ifrglobal.org/program/bulgaria-underwater/
Terrestrial: No
Underwater: Yes
Description:

Project Director: Dr. Nayden Prahov, archaeologist at the National Institute of Archaeology with Museum, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences; Program Director at Balkan Heritage Foundation.

Project Description:
The field school provides a comprehensive introduction to and training in underwater archaeology through participation in an ongoing research project – discovering the submerged heritage of ancient Mesambria, present-day Nessebar (UNESCO World Heritage Site) on the Bulgarian Black Sea Coast. The training will include various underwater archaeology and interdisciplinary practices: underwater reconnaissance survey, archaeological excavations, underwater photography, photogrammetry and 3D modeling, mapping and recording of submerged archaeological structures and monuments, marine geophysical survey, creating a GIS database, conservation of underwater sites and artifacts, etc. Our research aims to fill in the gaps in our scientific knowledge about the fortification system of Mesambria and its harbors, the coastal landscape changes and the Black Sea level fluctuation in Antiquity and Medieval Ages as well as the human adaptation.
The field school aim is to broaden the knowledge of our participants, to refine their skills and thus to enhance their career in Maritime Archaeology. It is open to beginners in the field too.

Nessebar   
Founded at the end of the Bronze Age by a Thracian tribe, Nessebar was one of the oldest towns on the western Black Sea Coast. Its name, which was originally Mesambria, originates from the Thracian words “Melsas”, the name of the legendary founder of the settlement and “bria”- the Thracian word for town. It is situated on a small peninsula (currently about 0.5 sq. km) that was connected to the mainland by a narrow isthmus. Mesambria’s first Greek colonizers were of Dorian origin who settled there at the end of the 6th century BCE. The town grew quickly and became one of the most powerful Greek colonies along the western Black Sea Coast. It had several temples, a gymnasium, a theatre, massive administrative buildings and corresponding infrastructure. Mesambria was also gradually surrounded by massive fortification walls. According to the ancient sources, it had two harbors, one to its north and another to its south.It reached the peak of its prosperity in the 3rd – 2nd centuries BCE, at which point it even minted its own gold coins. Commercial links connected it to towns from the Black Sea, Aegean, and Mediterranean coasts. Numerous imported precious artifacts now displayed in the Archaeological Museum of Nessebar provide material expression of the site’s rich economic, cultural, and spiritual life in this period. In 72 BCE, the town was conquered by Roman armies without resistance. In the beginning of 1st century CE, it was included within the borders of the Roman Empire. After the capital was moved to Constantinople in 324 CE and Christianity was accepted as the official religion of the Empire in 313 CE, favorable conditions arose for the renaissance of the town. New Christian basilicas, fortification walls, and water supply lines were built in the following centuries.
The city was besieged and taken for the first time by the Bulgarians in 812 CE. It was situated in border region between the Byzantine Empire and Bulgarian State (Chanate and Empire) and periodically changed hands between the two powers. During the 12th and 13th centuries, active trade links were developed between Nessebar and some Mediterranean and Adriatic towns, such as Constantinople, Venice, Genoa, Pisa, Ancona, and Dubrovnik as well as with the countries along the Danube River. During almost its entire Christian history, Nessebar was the seat of a bishop. Many churches and monasteries were built in the city and its surroundings reflecting its prosperity and richness.Nessebar fell under Ottoman rule together with the Byzantine capital Constantinople in 1453 CE. During the following centuries, the economic and spiritual life did not stop and Nessebar’s harbor continued to be an important import and export center. The shipyard’s production, one of the main subsidence of the town, served the Ottoman fleet and the local merchants. In 1878,  Nessebar was liberated from the Ottomans and included into the borders of Bulgaria. Due to its unique natural position, rich cultural heritage, and the large number of well-preserved monuments (esp. churches from the 13th – 14th centuries), modern-day Nessebar is an archaeological and architectural reserve. In 1983 the Old Quarter of Nessebar was included in UNESCO’s list of World Heritage Sites.

Underwater Heritage of Nessebar
Underwater studies in the region of Nessebar began in 1960 as a continuation of studies on land. Fifteen underwater archaeological campaigns were conducted in total (until 1983). During these studies, it was found that significant parts of the ancient town today are below the sea level. Ruins of fortification walls, towers (including a hexagonal one), staircases, gates and other structures from the pre-Roman era, Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages, were traced in various sectors around the peninsula – northwest, north, northeast, east. The tracked layout of the fortification walls of Mesembria leads us to conclude that due to sea transgression, landslide activity, sea abrasion and a series of earthquakes, Nessebar has lost a significant intramural part of its territory. Today it lays underwater at a depth between 1,5 and 6 meters.

Period(s) of Occupation: Antiquity, Medieval Age

Minimum Age: 18

Experience Required: Applicants must hold a SCUBA Open Water Certificate issued by any world-wide recognized training organization and up-to-date DAN insurance (http://www.daneurope.org/insurance). Participants should provide evidence (log book) of at least four dives within the year prior to the field school. If the participants do not meet this requirement, they must do two to four extra dives in Bulgaria before the start of the field school with our diving center partner at their own expense. Participants should provide their own diving equipment: diving suit (at least 5 mm wet suit recommended), BCD, regulator, mask, fins, snorkel, knife, booties, belt, etc.). If the participants don’t bring their own diving gear they can rent it from the partnering diving center at a price up to 20 EUR (approx. 24 USD) per day (depending on the items rented). Аir tanks and diving weights will be available at the site.

Room and Board Arrangements:
Accommodation: Participants will stay in comfortable rooms with two beds (bathrooms with shower and WC, TV, air-conditioning) in Emona Guest House in the downtown of historical Nessebar, close to the beach and the archaeological site. Staying an extra day costs 25 EUR. Single rooms are available upon request for an additional fee of 120 EUR per week. Meals: Breakfasts on work days as well as the welcome and the farewell dinners are covered by the admission fee. Students are responsible for their daily lunch and dinners and all meals on days off. Nessebar offers variety of restaurants that can meet everyone’s preferences and dietary requirements – from fast food options to cozy gourmet restaurants. The average meal price (soup/salad, main dish and dessert) can cost between 8 to 15 USD. The project team will recommend restaurants for different preferences (cuisine, cost, dietary needs) and will arrange discounts for the students. Participants must pay on their own for extra days and for single room accommodation as well as for extra meals, beverages, services and products!

Academic Credit: 8 Semester Credits offered by Connecticut College. Tuition is $5,784. Scholarships available.

Contact Information: info@ifrglobal.org