PRESIDENT

Christopher C. Fennell

Chris Fennell

Present Position(s):
Associate Professor of Anthropology and Law, and University Scholar, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign;
Visiting Associate Professor of Law, University of Chicago

Education
M.A., Ph.D., Anthropology, University of Virginia, 2000, 2003
J.D., Law, Georgetown University, 1989
M.A., American Civilization, University of Pennsylvania, 1986

Professional Service to SHA and Other Societies
SHA: Member of the Board of Directors, 2012–2015; Board Liaison to Technology Committee, 2012–2013; Board Liaison to Development Committee, 2014–2015; Chair, Development Committee, 2015–present; Sponsor and organizer, African Diaspora Archaeology Network events and anti-racism workshops at annual conferences; Historical Archaeology journal: Peer Reviewer, Contributor (four articles), Co-Editor (three thematic issues: nos. 44.1, 48.3, and 51.1). Compiler (three books); wrote accompanying introduction chapters on the state of the fields, for the Perspectives from Historical Archaeology series, on: African Diaspora Archaeology (2008), Revealing Landscapes (2011), and Investigations of Craft and Industrial Enterprise (2016)
Other Societies: Society for American Archaeology, Government Affairs Network State Representative for Illinois, 2016–present; President-elect, Illinois Archaeological Survey, 2016–2017; Peer Reviewer, journals of American Anthropological Association, Council for Northeast Historical Archaeology, and Midwest Archaeological Conference, and of book manuscripts for University Press of Florida, University of Illinois Press, Oxford University Press, and MIT Press; Editor and Publisher of African Diaspora Archaeology Newsletter, 2005–2012, and founding editor of the Journal of African Diaspora Archaeology and Heritage, 2011–present; Peer Reviewer of proposals and nominations for the National Science Foundation, National Park Service, Icelandic Centre for Research, and Portugal Foundation of Science and Technology, among others.

Research Interests
archaeology of craft and industrial enterprises; African diaspora studies; social identity, ethnicity, and racism; regional systems and commodity chains; stylistic and symbolic communications; civic engagement in collaborative, interdisciplinary projects

Biographical Statement
I am an archaeologist, anthropologist, and lawyer, specializing in historical archaeology, diaspora studies, and legal anthropology. After earning an M.A. in historical archaeology, I followed another interest and worked for several years in law, practicing in litigation and regulatory issues in Washington, DC, before returning to graduate studies for my doctoral degree. My research addresses subjects in transatlantic historical archaeology and the dynamics of social group affiliations and lifeways among Europeans, Africans, and various social groups within the Americas.
I work on interpretative frameworks focusing on social group identities, ethnic group dynamics and racism, regional systems and commodity chains, consumption patterns, symbolic and stylistic facets of material culture, and analysis of craft and industrial production. My projects at sites in Virginia, West Virginia, Illinois, and South Carolina have included interdisciplinary programs of multiyear, historical, and archaeological research, funded with grants from the NSF, NEH, and other agencies. These projects also focused on meaningful collaborations with members of local and descendant communities invested in those subjects. Through my work as a teacher, editor, lawyer, and manager of large-scale projects, I have gained considerable experience in advancing the interests that are central to SHA’s missions and goals.
In my field projects and service for professional societies, I have engaged more directly in recent years with the goals of the National Historic Preservation Act and the cultural resource management efforts of research firms and agencies such as the National Park Service. For example, the vast majority of archaeology projects related to past African American communities are conducted in CRM and NPS contexts, facilitated by the NHPA’s framework. My research, advocacy, publications, and efforts through educational outreach have focused on enhancing the strength of funding agency resources, CRM protocols, and federal and state research initiatives that strengthen our national memory and heritage.

Given the qualifications and experience outlined in your biographical statement, what do you believe you can contribute to SHA if elected as SHA President-Elect?

I am honored to be considered for election as SHA’s president-elect. I have worked in academic and legal settings, serve in a number of administrative roles, and manage large-scale, multiyear, collaborative projects. I also have extensive experience in engaging in the society’s initiatives and goals through my past work on the board and with the Development, Technologies, and Gender and Minority Affairs committees. I would bring such experiences, training, and interests to bear in my work to advance SHA’s goals and interests as president-elect. We face a challenging era for maintaining and focusing resources for our field and profession and for protection of the archaeological record, heritage sites, and curated collections. To tackle these challenges it will also be important for SHA to collaborate with affiliated organizations. I have learned much in this regard through my engagements as president-elect of my state’s professional society and as a member of the SAA’s Government Affairs Network. Throughout this process, it is vitally important to understand the priorities placed by the society’s members on these varied goals and interests and our prudent expenditure of budgetary resources. SHA has been very successful in remaining fiscally sound while pursuing important projects to enhance our field and profession and to engage in educational outreach to broad constituents.
If elected to serve

 If elected to serve SHA, what priorities would you emphasize?

SHA has achieved excellent results on many aspects of its mission and goals. I would like to see priorities placed on providing the best resources and professional training to the upcoming generation of young historical archaeologists and making those resources as affordable as possible to an expanding membership. We have also made great strides in advancing the ways in which our society is representative of the diverse membership and communities that we serve. An expanding international membership provides great intellectual vitality as well. All these efforts deserve long-term commitment.

I recently asked this question about priorities in a social gathering of several graduate students for whom I serve as adviser. I was proud of their replies. I thought that if I were still a graduate student, I might prioritize free happy hours at the conferences. Instead, they advocated for more outreach at all levels. We need to convey the amazing contributions of historical archaeology on land and sea to all levels of our communities. Outreach to elementary, middle, and high schools and to undergraduates will help recruit the professionals of future generations. Outreach to broad public audiences, local and descendant communities, and elected and regulatory officials will help ensure our nation’s commitment to understanding our past, improving our future, and protecting the resources and records of archaeological and historical knowledge.

SHA’s excellent work in government advocacy and lobbying to protect historical heritage resources should continue to be advanced as much as possible. For example, the recent formation of the Coalition for American Heritage provides a tremendous opportunity for effective, cost-efficient advocacy on behalf of cultural resource management interests. This coalition is supported by a collaboration of SHA, SAA, AAA, and ACRA, and employs advocates at Cultural Heritage Partners who possess terrific expertise in addressing resource issues at local, state, and federal levels with focused, educational outreach efforts. I am an individual, supporting member of the Coalition, and find their initiatives inspiring. I hope to contribute to SHA by engaging regularly with our members to understand their greatest concerns, and to seek out effective collaborations to realize those goals.

 

Barbara J. Heath

Barbara Heath

Present Position 
Associate Professor, University of Tennessee, Knoxville

Education
Ph.D., American Civilization with a specialization in historical archaeology, University of Pennsylvania, 1988
B.A., Anthropology and Spanish, The College of William and Mary, 1982

Professional Service to SHA and Other Relevant Groups
Society for Historical Archaeology: Nominations Committee, 2000; Membership Committee (chair), 2003–present; Budget Committee, 2005; Board of Directors, 2003–2005; Development Committee, 2005; silent auction coordinator 2006–2007; Editorial Advisory Committee, 2007–2014; Council for Northeast Historical Archaeology: Executive Board, 1992–1995; regional newsletter editor, 1996–2006; Archaeology Conservancy: Editorial Advisory Board, 2006–2008
Council of Virginia Archaeologists, Inc.: President, 2004–2006, Past President, 2008–2010; Treasurer, 1994–2003; Executive Board, 1994–2007, 2008–2010; Public Education Committee 1995–2007; Public Education Committee Chair, 2002–2003; State Plan Committee, 2007

Research Interests
archaeology of the African diaspora, colonialism, historic landscapes, consumerism, digital archaeology, public archaeology

Biographical Statement
I am an educator, researcher, and advocate for archaeology, with experience in cultural resource management, historic preservation, state government, community engagement, and higher education. I currently serve as Associate Professor of Anthropology and Director of Graduate Studies at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, where I teach historical archaeology at the undergraduate and graduate levels and mentor M.A. and Ph.D. students. Prior to my arrival at UTK, I directed the public archaeology program at Thomas Jefferson’s Poplar Forest from 1992 to 2006, and taught as an adjunct faculty member at the University of Virginia, Virginia Commonwealth University, and Sweet Briar College. From 1988 to 1991, I supervised fieldwork and served as Acting Director of Archaeology at Monticello. I have fulfilled a variety of roles in SHA, most importantly as a member of the board and as chair of the membership committee. In addition to my professional involvements with SHA and other archaeological societies detailed above, I served on the Virginia State Review Board for five years, which reviews and approves National Register nominations at the state level, and continue to serve as a member of other preservation-related advisory groups.

My publications focus on topics relating to the intersection between slavery, landscapes, and consumerism. My current research focuses on 17th-century colonial interactions on Virginia’s Northern Neck. This work arose from my long-term interest in the archaeology of colonialism and the African diaspora and a desire to re-engage with older archaeological collections. My current project is part of a larger body of collaborative research on the Potomac River valley and contributes to efforts to make archaeological data available and accessible for online research through digital resources such as Colonial Encounters and The Digital Archaeological Archive of Comparative Slavery.

Given the qualifications and experience outlined in your biographical statement, what do you believe you can contribute to SHA if elected as SHA President-Elect/Board Member?

Over the last 30 years, I have worked in archaeology across a variety of settings, including cultural resource management, state government, historic sites, and academia, and been an active member of state, regional, national, and international professional societies. This combination of experiences has helped me to develop strong leadership skills and has provided me with a broad and balanced perspective on the challenges facing the discipline. I have extensive administrative experience overseeing personnel, scheduling and budgets; have worked collaboratively with colleagues in multiple institutions on a variety of research and publishing projects; have been active in public education and mentoring students and new professionals, and have a strong network within and outside of SHA whose expertise and advice I can draw on to benefit the society.

I attended my first SHA meeting in Williamsburg, Virginia when I was a graduate student in the early 1980s: ever since, SHA has been my professional home; a place to engage with new research, to visit with old friends, to introduce students to the profession, to share my own work, and to collaborate with colleagues on society business. SHA benefits from strong and effective leadership, a talented and committed staff, and important liaisons with other professional communities. Over the course of more than 30 years of membership, and through participation on the budget and development committees, the membership committee, and the editorial advisory committee, I have developed a solid understanding of the operations of the society and the challenges that it faces in maintaining a strong financial base, attracting and maintaining members, disseminating excellent scholarship, and partnering with diverse constituents. My service as membership committee chair has put me in touch with a broad cross-section of archaeologists, and, through the administration and analysis of surveys, has provided the society with important information about member needs and interests. I understand the factors that attract people to join SHA and that affect membership renewal, and have worked with the committee and the board to address concerns of students and new professionals through creating new categories of membership. Strong and stable membership numbers are critical to everything that SHA hopes to achieve as an organization, especially our ability to engage in education and advocacy at a time of such fiscal and political uncertainty.

If elected to serve SHA, what priorities would you emphasize?

At this moment in time, nearly all aspects of SHA’s mission are under assault through attacks on existing legislation, funding cuts, and a pervasive anti-intellectual political climate. It is critical that we use the society’s resources to strengthen our voice and continue to build ties with our many partners in preservation to combat the myriad legislative and administrative threats to archaeological resources and the work of archaeologists worldwide. Opposing attempts to dismantle or eradicate the legal frameworks and funding sources that support the preservation and management of cultural resources, research, and interpretation has to be a top priority. We should not lose sight of other important priorities, however: to educate others and ourselves, to produce and share knowledge, and to maintain high ethical standards. Beyond reacting to outward threats, we should work together as an inclusive body of researchers and educators to learn and teach diverse audiences about the past. Building alliances, lobbying, and educating are all useful strategies for opposing external threats, but will also strengthen the stated goals of SHA. Central to achieving these goals is our ability to sustain the organization through sound financial management, targeted development goals, and a stable membership base. I will work closely with the board and committee chairs on a strong advocacy agenda and to set realistic financial and membership goals that will enable us to continue to make progress during these difficult times.

Treasurer

Sara F. Mascia

Sara Mascia

Current Position
Vice President, Historical Perspectives, Inc., Westport, Connecticut

Education
Ph.D., Archaeology, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts, 1995
M.A., Archaeology, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts, 1989
B.A., Anthropology and History, University of South Carolina, 1983

Professional Service
CNEHA: Board Member, Executive Vice Chair, Treasurer, 2006 Conference Co-Chair (with Nancy Brighton); SHA: Employment Coordinator; Member, Nominating Committee, Conference Committee, Academic and Professional Training Committee, Membership Committee; Secretary-Treasurer; Treasurer

Research Interests
American material culture, farmstead sites, historical cemetery studies, urban archaeology, accounting and bookkeeping

Biographical Statement
I have always believed that volunteerism is essential to the health and growth of historical archaeology. I further believe that it is a privilege to serve on the board and the SHA committees that help promote our field to our colleagues and the public. I have been a member of the society for over 30 years and during that time I have served on several committees including the Nominating, Conference, Membership, and Academic and Professional Training Committees. I have also had the privilege to serve for many years on the SHA Board. As a result, I have been able to work with a large number of SHA members to help further our discipline and encourage SHA’s efforts in providing excellent publications and meetings for the membership. Working on committees has also provided me with insight into some of the issues that SHA members face as practitioners of a very complex discipline.

As a Vice President at Historical Perspectives, Inc. for over ten years, I have supervised staff and prepared budgets for a variety of complex projects and administered all aspects of project management. My work in cultural resources management has provided me with the skills to work within the fiscal parameters of a balanced budget. This proficiency has further provided me with the foundation for my service as the Treasurer for the Society for Historical Archaeology.

Given the qualifications and experience outlined in your biographical statement, what do you believe you can contribute to SHA if elected as SHA Treasurer?

One of my primary goals when I began my role as SHA Treasurer was to streamline the expenses of our organization in order to build the society’s reserve funds. The establishment of an appropriate reserve will help ensure that SHA remains financially healthy in our challenging economy. I continue to believe that the growth and maintenance of SHA depends on the stability of our reserves, which enables the society to accomplish our long-term goals and support our student members. Over the last several years I have worked closely with our investment account manager to slowly increase our reserves to a level considered to be appropriate.

The most challenging task of the SHA Treasurer is keep our membership and conference fees as stable as possible while working to safeguard all of the unique services that the society provides to our members. My experience with CRM finance, academic grant management, association budget coordination, investment management, and accounting, combined with the recognition of the unique elements that make up our society, enable me to efficiently work with SHA board members and our Executive Director on maintaining balanced budgets.

If elected to serve as a Treasurer of SHA what priorities would you emphasize taking into account SHA’s missions and goals, ongoing committee activities, and the management and financial challenges of the Society?

I have been fortunate to serve as the Treasurer for the society for several years. With the assistance of the entire SHA board, SHA has established a firm financial foundation providing us with the means to maintain the production of high-quality publications and inspiring conferences.

As Treasurer of SHA, I have been provided with the opportunities to meet and work with peers and students on pertinent issues that are encountered by all working archaeologists. Over the last few years, there have been some potential political discussions and pronouncements that have threatened historic resources and the foundation of the system of protections for archaeological sites in the United States. I believe that one of our priorities is both vigilant monitoring of our elected officials for any potential threats to the protection of historic sites and public archaeology and speaking out on behalf of our members and colleagues. To that end, I sincerely believe that the promotion of our discipline, as well as the diverse projects that our members are working on, provides a bridge for the public to understand the research aims of all historical archaeologists.
If I am re-elected to the board, my overall priority is to ensure that SHA maintains a balanced budget while meeting the needs of our diverse members. SHA has been a successful organization for five decades and as a member of the board, I believe it is our responsibility to encourage both student and professional participation in our organization. I also will continue to encourage the expansion of our public presence (e.g., the website and SHA publications) and to advocate for our student members. I believe that SHA’s support for student members and the spirit of volunteerism is vital to the continued growth of the society.

Research Editor

Annalies Corbin

Annalies Corbin

Present Position(s):
President and CEO, PAST Foundation

Education:
Ph.D., History and Historical Archaeology, University of Idaho, 2000. Multidisciplinary doctorate program—specializing in transportation history and the American West (Department of History) and historical archaeology (Department of Anthropology)
M.A., Maritime History and Nautical Archaeology, East Carolina University, 1995
B.S., Anthropology, University of South Dakota, 1993

Professional Service to SHA and Other Societies:
SHA: Co-Publications Editor, 2007–present; Associate Editor, Historical Archaeology, 2000–2006; Book Reviews Editor, Historical Archaeology, 2001–2003; Technical Briefs in Historical Archaeology: Associate Editor, 2004–2006; Journal of Maritime Archaeology: Co-Editor in Chief, 2010–present

Research Interests:
advancing education through quality applied research, maritime archaeology, global sustainability and impact, social justice and equity, STEM education and policy

Biographical Statement:
I am the Founder, President and CEO and Chief Goddess of the PAST Foundation. The PAST Foundation was founded in 2000 and is an organization we envisioned could lead the way to connecting scientific research with classrooms, schools, and communities. PAST opened its headquarters in Columbus, Ohio in 2005, assembling a team that could grow the reach and mission—all steeped within an anthropological lens.

From a single school partnership in 2006, we have grown PAST’s partnerships across the nation, building a reputation for both transforming educational delivery and understanding tomorrow’s education needs. In 2015, our commitment to transforming schools led to the development of PAST Innovation Lab. This lab connects educators, students, business, and community partners together to create innovative learning programs in the nation’s first independent Education R & D Prototyping Facility. PAST is transforming the landscape of teaching and learning by taking our roots in anthropology and archaeology as the primary driver in program redesign, creating transdisciplinary problem-based learning environments.

Our work at the PAST Foundation has been recognized many times over the years. Most recently, the foundation was also honored with the Smart 50, top Innovation Award, selected by the White House to collaborate on the Next Generation High Schools Summit, and recognized for its Excellence in Education as reported by the U.S. Department of Education in its STEM 2026 report.

Given the qualifications and experience outlined in your biographical statement, what do you believe you can contribute to SHA if elected as SHA President-Elect/Board Member?

I have been involved with SHA-based research and publications since 2001. My commitment to ensuring that SHA members have meaningful outlets for research, work, and public engagement through publications fulfills a primary requirement as a practicing archaeologist.

If elected to serve SHA, what priorities would you emphasize?

One of SHA’s strategic priorities is to reach further into the global community. One of the primary ways in which SHA can ensure reaching this goal is by maintaining a strong and relevant research publications program via the society’s journal, Historical Archaeology, and through a robust and diverse co-publications program.

 

Christopher N. Matthews

Chris Matthews

Present Position(s):
Journal Editor, Historical Archaeology; Professor of Anthropology, Montclair State University

Education:
Ph.D. Anthropology, Columbia University, 1998
B.A., Anthropology, George Washington University, 1989

Professional Service to SHA and Other Societies:
SHA: Editor, Historical Archaeology, 2014–present; Associate Editor, 2010–2014; Member, Academic and Professional Training Committee, 2008–2014

Research Interests:
African Diaspora archaeology, race, inequality, capitalism, landscape

Biographical Statement:
In addition to serving as the Editor of Historical Archaeology, I am a professor of anthropology at Montclair State University as well as co-director of the ‘A Long Time Coming’ project in Setauket, New York and the ‘Reverse Archaeology of Interstate-280 Project’ in Orange, New Jersey. My research and service work is designed to advance a deeper understanding of the materiality of inequality associated with development of modernity. My research is focused on the historical archaeology of minority communities and the development of critical heritage and related public discourses connected to illuminating racism and class formation. I have a Ph.D. in anthropology from Columbia University, and I am the author of An Archaeology of History and Tradition and The Archaeology of American Capitalism and co-editor of Ethnographic Archaeologies and The Archaeology of Race in the Northeast.

Given the qualifications and experience outlined in your biographical statement, what do you believe you can contribute to SHA if elected as SHA President-Elect/Board Member?

As a professor of anthropology, I will contribute a perspective on trends in academia, especially regarding ongoing debates regarding research funding. As Journal Editor, I have been a leader in the society for the past four years and have worked to deepen the impact of the journal worldwide. Serving as a board member I will draw form these experience to ensure that SHA continues to be an open community welcoming to people from diverse heritages and backgrounds. I will also support the effort of SHA to work its peer organizations and cultural heritage partners to ensure the preservation of a concern for and value of material heritage as an essential part of American democracy.

If elected to serve SHA, what priorities would you emphasize?

If elected to serve as an SHA board member, I will continue to advocate for the value of historical archaeology in contemporary discussions of power and inequality from a global perspective. My career has been dedicated to enhancing—through both research and publication—the impact of historical archaeology as a voice for challenging dominant and exclusive narratives about the past. I am also advocate for greater inclusion of diversity in the profession through both the characteristics of our members and the nature of society activities.

SHA BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Flordeliz (Florie) T. Bugarin

Present Position(s):
Associate Professor, African Studies Department, Howard University

Education:
Ph.D., Anthropology, University of Florida, 2002
M.A., University of Florida, 1996
B.A., University of California, Berkeley 1991

Professional Service to SHA and Other Societies:
SHA: Organized two GMAC-sponsored Anti-Racist Workshops for the 2017 conference (the Introductory Workshop and the Second Steps Workshop) in Fort Worth, TX, 2016–2017; Local Arrangements Chair, Conference Organizing Committee, SHA 2016 Conference—duties included: toured location site of the conference; helped organize the Past President’s Luncheon and the annual SHA Conference Museum Reception; coordinated with other local committee members, such as the organizer of the Public Archaeology Forum and the organizer of the conference excursions; organized some conference excursions, including a tour of Mount Vernon and the 2016 GMAC Conference Excursion that highlighted African American sites, 2015–2016; Organizer, Co-Chair, and Participant, GMAC sponsored Introductory Anti-Racist Workshop for the 2016 SHA conference in Washington, DC, 2015–2016; Established the GMAC sponsored Mark E. Mack Community Engagement Award—co-wrote the proposal and submitted it to the SHA Board. It was approved, implemented, and awarded during the 2016 and 2017 SHA Conference Award Ceremonies, in Washington, DC and Fort Worth, TX, 2015–2016; Organizer and Co-Host, Roundtable Luncheon on issues of anti-racism, “Race and the SHA,” session RL-2, co-hosted with Carol McDavid, for the 2016 SHA session on Anti-Racism and Diversity in Historical Archaeology, SHA Conference, Washington, DC, January 2016; Organizer, Co-Chair, and Participant, GMAC sponsored Anti-Racist Workshop for the 2015 SHA conference in Seattle, WA, 2014–2015; GMAC Diversity Field School Competition: designed, proposed to the SHA Board, and implemented the competition on December 23, 2013: negotiated with publishers who provided books as an award for this competition and formed a committee to review the applicants. Since 2013, this competition has been an annual event; GMAC Diversity Photo Competition: designed, proposed to the SHA Board, and implemented the competition in December 2013. In following years, this competition was subsumed into the ACUA photo competition. A diversity category is now included in the annual competition; Chair, Gender and Minority Affairs Committee (GMAC), 2012–2017; Attendee (as Chair of the GMAC) with SHA President Paul Mullins, the anti-racism training workshop, “The People’s Institute for Survival and Beyond—Undoing Racism,” Washington, DC, July 13–15, 2012; Attendee (as Chair of the GMAC), Diversity Training Retreat, held for SHA Board members in Alexandria, VA, June 15, 2012
World Archaeology Congress: served as the elected USA Representative to the Assembly for the Seventh World Archaeological Congress (WAC-7), The Dead Sea, Jordan, January 13–18, 2013; served as the elected USA Representative to the Assembly for the Sixth World Archaeological Congress (WAC-6), June 30–July 4, 2008, Dublin, Ireland
AAA: Elected Member of the AAA Committee on Minority Affairs (CMIA), 2013–2017
Howard University: Chair, Sociology and Anthropology Special Events Committee, 2009–2011—organized, directed, and raised funds for the departmental conference, “Windows from the Present to the Past: The Archaeology of Africa and the African Diaspora”, February 25–27, 2010. This event brought more than 30 historical archaeologists to Howard University to discuss the latest research regarding the heritage of Africans and people of African descent.
Peer Reviewer: Nomination of the town site New Philadelphia, Illinois as a National Historic Landmark, spring 2008. New Philadelphia was nominated due to the significant information the archaeological resources might provide for our understandings of African American historical sites and free multi-racial rural communities.
Designer and Director: Workshop on the World Bank’s Safeguard Policy on Physical Cultural Resources in accordance with the Fifth World Archaeological Congress (WAC-5) for the World Bank Department of the Environmentally and Socially Sustainable Development, Quality Control (ESD/QC)

Research Interests:
Africa and African Diaspora, diversity and anti-racism, conservation and international development, child material culture, environment, and the colonial contact period to the post-Reconstruction years

Biographical Statement:
As an academic and applied archaeologist, I have strived to practice historical archaeology while being mindful of the importance of working with descendent and local communities. My research focuses on trade and exchange, slavery, child material culture, and environment, and covers the colonial contact period to the post-Reconstruction years. My applied work looks at (1) the intersections between archaeology and racism, (2) ways in which we can transform our organizations into bodies that are more diverse, and (3) ethics, safeguards, and the management of sites as a strategy of poverty alleviation. Beyond my research, I am also an Associate Professor who works at Howard University, an HBCU. As a teacher, I try to inspire students of color to become historical archaeologists, and I encourage them to adapt a service-oriented, community-driven approach to their research.

Specifically, I am interested in how historical archaeology and the conservation of heritage sites align with the triumphs and challenges of people today. How does our profession impact, perpetuate, or solve modern social problems such as racism? While I have focused on the archaeology of Africa and the African Diaspora, I have broadened my interests to include the archaeology of other populations of color and recipients of different forms of discrimination such as gender inequities and sexism.

I hope to contribute to an SHA that fights to be all-inclusive. As a scholar who has done international and national historical archaeology, I hope that the future of the discipline will include diversity, increased international involvement, and more collaboration with descendant, local, and public communities. I aspire to see an SHA that attracts people of color, members of the LGBTQ community, people with disabilities, and people from all economic levels. If elected, I will work towards growing SHA by attempting to create a more diverse organization.

Given the qualifications and experience outlined in your biographical statement, what do you believe you can contribute to SHA if elected as SHA President-Elect/Board Member?

I began my journey in historical archaeology in the 90s when I studied with Jim Deetz at U.C. Berkeley, attended his Flowerdew Hundred field school, and accompanied him to South Africa. I continued studies under Kathy Deagan and Peter Schmidt at the University of Florida where I began work in Africa and gained further understanding of how historical archaeology is practiced globally. With almost 30 years of experience, I feel qualified to be an SHA Board member, since I can pass down their insights and create unique opportunities for members.

My committee work demonstrates my devotion to SHA, issues of diversity, and anti-racism. I have been the Chair of the SHA Gender and Minority Affairs Committee for five years, and the Local Arrangements Chair for the 2016 SHA conference. I was elected to the AAA Committee on Minority Issues in Anthropology and twice elected as the USA Representative to the Assembly for the World Archaeological Congress. I organized a conference at Howard U. on the historical archaeology of Africa and the African Diaspora, an event that attracted about 30 scholars and involved raising funds for expenses and grants.
Through my experiences, I have reached out to the public and have inspired different people to love historical archaeology. I have lived in a South African township, worked at a Gambian World Heritage site, and run field schools in low-income rural areas. My research at Nicodemus, an all-black town established in Kansas, is on display at the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture.

My work has helped me create solutions, manage with few resources, and navigate different agendas. With these qualifications, I will offer a unique perspective to the board. While maintaining sound financial strategies, I want to help grow SHA yet preserve its family spirit.

If elected to serve as a director of SHA, what priorities would you emphasize taking into account SHA’s missions and goals, and ongoing committee activities, and the management and financial challenges of the Society?

I would be honored to serve on the SHA Board, and if elected, I would work on increasing our membership and enhancing our international footprint. I believe that the best way to do this is to reach out to minorities, students, the general public, and people of all backgrounds both at home and abroad. To see SHA flourish, I will strive towards creating an all-inclusive community that maintains member benefits, pinpoints the needs of members, and manages a budget that sustains affordable dues. I am committed to working with SHA members to make archaeology more accessible. I also live in the Washington, D.C. area so I am available to meet with representatives to advocate for our profession and society.

One priority would be to inspire more students. As a professor, I have seen the impact of reaching undergraduates early in their academic careers and educating younger students before they go to college. Through more partnerships with schools and services for teachers, we can raise awareness about historical archaeology.

I would also support the SHA Gender and Minority Affairs Committee (GMAC), while urging all the committees to work together. I would advocate for the anti-racist workshops and other programs that encourage diversity. I would continue to support incentives and awards that encourage members to engage in diversity initiatives.
While identifying areas that lack representation, we need to recognize that SHA can only attract and keep members if our dues are affordable and our programs meet their needs. In many circumstances, I have had to devise creative solutions under financial constraints. If elected, I will work to increase SHA resources and maintain a wide array of services and programs. My goal would be to sustain the interests of our members and draw the attention of a diverse and global audience.

 

Carl G. Drexler

Carl Drexler

Present Position(s):
Research Assistant Professor, University of Arkansas, and the Arkansas Archeological Survey’s Station Archeologist at the Southern Arkansas University research station, Magnolia

Education:
Ph.D., Anthropology, The College of William & Mary, 2013
M.A., Anthropology, University of Nebraska, 2004
B.A., Anthropology, Grinnell College, 2002

Professional Service to SHA and Other Societies:
SHA: Academic and Professional Training Committee (2010–present); Continuing Education Coordinator (2011–present)
Arkansas Historical Association: Member, Board of Trustees, (2015–present)
Friends of the Arkansas State Archives: Member, Board of Trustees, (2016–present)

Research Interests:
conflict archaeology, spatial analysis, digital archaeology, African Diaspora archaeology, rural communities, memory and memorialization, geophysics and remote sensing, Caribbean archaeology, Southeastern Archaeology, heritage tourism

Biographical Statement:
I came to archaeology while an undergraduate at Grinnell College. My advisor handed me a book on the Little Bighorn, which introduced me to historical archaeology and took me to the University of Nebraska for my master’s degree. I pursued dissertation work on the Battle of San Juan Hill, in Cuba, at the College of William and Mary. Geopolitics derailed that project, and I wound up working on rural civilian communities in conflict situations for my doctorate. Since becoming a professional archeologist, I have been privileged to work for the National Park Service, Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, Arkansas Archeological Survey, and U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center. My current position is a fascinating blend of academia, public outreach, and government agency archaeology in service to rural communities in the American South, which continually gives me the opportunity to engage with and serve those around me.

Given the qualifications and experience outlined in your biographical statement, what do you believe you can contribute to SHA if elected as SHA President-Elect/Board Member?

I bring together a mix of perspectives for academia, public archaeology, and government agency archaeology. Living and working in rural southwest Arkansas, I work very closely with numerous community groups to advance heritage-focused projects that employ archaeology in some fashion, ranging from cemetery preservation and research to heritage tourism. This gives me the chance to articulate global perspectives with rural economic, social, and political networks. As the Continuing Education Coordinator and member of the Academic and Professional Training Committee, I have been part of SHA’s efforts to provide professional training to members in recent years, and would be a big proponent of furthering those efforts and finding ways to make them more accessible to all.

If elected to serve as a director of SHA, what priorities would you emphasize taking into account SHA’s missions and goals, and ongoing committee activities, and the management and financial challenges of the Society?

I would work to build programs supporting archaeologists working with rural communities and to build resources connecting isolated scholars. As the only archaeologist for 100 miles, I know that it can be a lonely existence. Also, as the only anthropologist at my host institution, I understand well how elastic isolated scholars’ teaching responsibilities are frequently required to be, and finding ways of meeting their needs would be a priority for me. This would include maintaining and expanding existing syllabus clearinghouses and developing workshops and webinars focusing on topics needed by our membership. I would also work with the business office to explore new ways of offering and structuring workshops and other training opportunities at the annual conference. These have been very valuable resources, and members have offered innovative ideas in the past few years both in terms of topics and how those workshops are hosted. While I am excited to see these come along, we need to develop the institutional mechanisms to support them in a systematic, businesslike manner.

 

Frederick H. Hanselmann

Fred Hanselmann

Present Position:
Faculty, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Miami

Education:
Ph.D., 2016, Anthropology, Indiana University
M.A., 2010, Anthropology, Indiana University
M.P.A., 2007, Indiana University
B.A., 2003, Anthropology, Brigham Young University

Professional Service to SHA and Other Societies:
2017 Underwater Program Chair

Research Interests:
underwater and maritime archaeology, maritime cultural landscapes and borderlands, underwater cultural heritage management, marine protected areas

Biographical Statement:
I am Faculty in the Department of Marine Ecosystems and Society and part of the Exploration Sciences Program at the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Miami, where I direct programs in underwater archaeology and underwater exploration. Having worked on underwater sites from a wide variety of time periods, my research has ranged from submerged prehistoric deposits in springs and caves to historic shipwrecks in Latin America and the Caribbean, including the wreck of the Quedagh Merchant, abandoned by Captain Kidd in 1699 off the coast of Hispaniola. I co-directed the first-ever archaeological survey off the mouth of the Chagres River in Panama and currently direct the Río Chagres Maritime Landscape Study as well as the Lost Ships of Henry Morgan Project. I am one of the principal investigators of the Monterrey Shipwreck Project and the principal investigator of the Spring Lake Underwater Geoarchaeology Project, as well as involvement in projects in Colombia and Cuba. I also focus on capacity building and training for archaeologists and heritage managers in less-developed countries, as well as the development of marine protected areas and underwater preserves. A number of my projects have also received a good amount of media and publicity. As we move into the future, I believe that working with our colleagues from other disciplines is tantamount to successful research and more all-encompassing results. Collaboration is the key to facilitating more projects on multiple levels and incorporating students as well. I also hope to see more technological advances that help make archaeological work within shallower depths more efficient and productive. Finally, I think it is important that more of us embrace the media to get our message, research findings, and discoveries out to the general public as well as combat misinformation or conflicting views of our field.

Given the qualifications and experience outlined in your biographical statement, what do you believe you can contribute to SHA if elected as SHA President-Elect/Board Member?

As two SHA presidents have pointed out within the last few years, our mission is never over when it comes to public outreach. With the numerous programs, documentaries, and other sources of misinformation and misconceptions, there continues to be a need to better inform the public of what archaeology is, what archaeologists do, and why it is important. I believe that I can contribute to SHA in assisting with and media or public outreach efforts and moving forward with a potential plan to highlight a variety of archaeological projects and research, both terrestrial and underwater. Additionally, my professional experience in the Caribbean, Central America, and South America, as well as my international connections can help broaden SHA and involve more international archaeologists from a variety of countries.

If elected to serve SHA, what priorities would you emphasize?

As previously noted, I believe that public outreach and media efforts are of great importance moving into the future. I would also like to emphasize or create networking opportunities across disciplines so that broader research efforts can be accomplished. Along that same vein, I would like to continue to bring in new members from outside of the United States and create international networks that can help build capacity where it is needed or desired. I would like to make SHA available and applicable to archaeologists that would not normally be involved and broaden the society’s membership within the Western Hemisphere and specifically Latin America.

 

Audrey Horning

Audrey Horning

Present Position(s):
Arts and Sciences Distinguished Professor of Anthropology, College of William and Mary; Professor of Archaeology and Fellow, Senator George J. Mitchell Institute for Global Peace, Security, and Justice, Queen’s University Belfast

Education:
Ph.D., Historical Archaeology, University of Pennsylvania, 1995
M.A., American Civilization, University of Pennsylvania
B.A., Anthropology and History, College of William and Mary, 1989

Professional Service to SHA and Other Societies:
SHA: Conference Co-Chair and Terrestrial Program Co-chair, Leicester UK, 2013; Associate Editor, Historical Archaeology, 2004–present; Member, Awards Committee, 2014–present; Elected Member, Nominations Committee, 2012–2014; Intersociety Relations Committee
Society for Post-Medieval Archaeology (SPMA): Council Member, 2000–present; Officer roles include Monograph Editor, 2012–present; Secretary, 2006–2012; Newsletter Editor, 2004–2006; Website Manager, 2002–2004
Irish Post-Medieval Archaeology Group: Co-founder and Committee member, 2001–present; Officer roles include Secretary, Newsletter Editor
British Academy: Member, Reflections on Archaeology (steering group), 2015–2017
University Archaeology UK (steering group): Elected Member, 2015–2016
Society of Antiquaries London and the Society of Antiquaries Scotland: Elected Fellow

Research Interests:
comparative colonialism; Atlantic World; archaeology and conflict transformation; archaeological ethics

Biographical Statement:
I have been an active member of SHA since 1990 and I am delighted to have been nominated to run for the board. Over my career, I have been fortunate to work on both sides of the Atlantic—in the U.S., England, and Northern Ireland—giving me insight into both the global expansion of the discipline as well as its diverse regional and national expressions. While currently a university-based academic, I have also worked across sectors, for the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, with the National Park Service, and in private-sector cultural resource management. In addition to my service with SHA, I have worked hard to develop historical archaeology on the island of Ireland as a founding member of the Irish Post-Medieval Archaeology Group, while also serving the UK-based Society for Post-Medieval Archaeology in various capacities as a Council member since 2000. Both these roles allowed me to engage with the different contexts, forms of research, and development needs of Irish, British, and European postmedieval archaeology. I was very pleased to be able to serve as conference co-chair for SHA’s second non-North American annual conference held in Leicester, England in 2013. Our aim with that conference was to expand understandings of practice and research on both sides of the Atlantic, bringing together scholars from over 50 countries and reaching individuals who might not typically be involved with SHA. My research itself builds on this transatlantic perspective by engaging directly with the contested historical legacies of early modern European expansion, particularly in Northern Ireland but also in the U.S. I have learned that archaeology can play a critical role in contemporary conversations and conflict transformation, and as such I am very keen to see the society continue to develop its leading role in encouraging and facilitating ethical and community-inclusive practice. Archaeology for me ‘matters’ because it is highly relevant to addressing contemporary global challenges. I would like to work with the society in fostering capacity-building efforts with global partners, a process that must be rooted in a critical awareness of and respect for the different needs and circumstances of practitioners and those many communities with whom we work.

Given the qualifications and experience outlined in your biographical statement, what do you believe you can contribute to SHA if elected as SHA President-Elect/Board Member?

I believe that my 27 years of active SHA membership and my officer roles with international sister societies will provide a valuable perspective to board discussions in terms of experience in global historical archaeology, knowledge of the society, and understanding of the challenges of running voluntary organizations. Additionally, I have experience in working across sectors and with a range of community partners. Throughout my career I have prioritized discourse and think it is important to have conversations across silos rather than only within silos. By way of illustration, in 2009 I and colleague Professor Marilyn Palmer organized a conference and follow-up publication entitled Crossing Paths or Sharing Tracks as the result of our shared concern about the fragmentation of historical archaeology into different specialized groups and societies—those focusing on postmedieval archaeology, industrial archaeology, and contemporary archaeology. The result was more than the sum of its parts, with recognition of a shared mission as well as the value of supporting each other in the further development of new approaches to old problems.

If elected to serve SHA, what priorities would you emphasize?

There are two strands to my answer. One relates to the practical day-to-day running of the society, for which I would bring a pragmatic perspective developed through my former role in university senior management as Head of the School of Geography, Archaeology and Palaeoecology at Queen’s University Belfast. In that role I was responsible for a multimillion pound yearly budget, management of over 70 academic, technical, and professional services staff, and oversight of more than 500 students during a challenging period of austerity and university restructuring. While prosaic, it is imperative that the society be well run as members expect value for their money. Furthermore, a well-run society is able to take risks and develop new initiatives without fear of destabilization. The second, more-exciting strand to my answer is to help lead the continuing development of SHA as a body with a conscience, willing to step up and be seen and heard on matters of concern to our discipline, our members, our community partners, and of course all those long gone for whom we speak as archaeologists. In recent years the society has taken on more of an activist, outward-looking stance which I wholeheartedly support and would welcome the opportunity to share in further developing that mission.

NOMINATIONS and ELECTIONS

Liza Gijanto

Liza Gijanto

Present Position(s):
Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, St. Mary’s College of Maryland

Education:
Ph.D., Anthropology, Syracuse University, 2010
M.A., Archaeology, University College London, Institute of Archaeology, 2002
B.A., Anthropology and History, Rutgers University, 2000
Professional Service to SHA and Other Societies:
SHA: Member, 2002–present; Member, GMAC, 2014–present; Coordinator, Harriet Tubman Student Travel Award, 2015–present; Member, Curation Committee, 2016–present
Society for American Archaeology; American Anthropological Association; Society for Africanist Archaeology; Society for Applied Anthropology; Archaeology Society of Maryland, St. Mary’s County chapter: Member, past and current

Research Interests:
African Atlantic archaeology, Atlantic World, heritage and tourism, postcolonial studies, slavery and abolition, digital field methods

Biographical Statement:
Since 2001 I have worked on projects in the United States, West Africa, and the Caribbean primarily associated with communities of African descent. I focus on the complex socioeconomic relationships that formed the fabric of the Atlantic World which came to define our own understanding of race, class, and gender and strive to make my students view their experiences as directly connected to this period.
I have dedicated most of my career in archaeology to training students including instilling a strong ethical compass and sense of responsibility to the public. Part of my commitment to training students is to promote diversity within our field. For me diversity not only includes race and gender but also mentoring students from a range of socioeconomic backgrounds as well as those from outside the United States. As part of my 13 years working in The Gambia, I have provided field opportunities and training to university and grade-school students as well as museum and heritage professionals alongside American field school students. Guiding all of this work is my goal to promote a view of stewardship and research that always engages the local community and other stakeholders with an interest in the project.
In addition to encouraging students to contribute to the research design and interpretations of projects in the field and classroom, I have brought a number of undergraduates to SHA annual meetings, either as a coauthor or mentor, to present posters and papers drawing on independent research developed out of field school experiences.
Our field is uniquely situated to engage a wide range of audiences in addition to being relevant to the numerous communities which seek to engage with their past. The best way to communicate this as well as to ensure the ethical stewardship of archaeological and heritage sites, it is important to expose students from diverse backgrounds to archaeology, whether or not they choose to become professionals.

Given the qualifications and experience outlined in your biographical statement, what do you believe you can contribute to SHA if elected as SHA President-Elect/Board Member?

If I am elected to the Nominations Committee, I believe my international experience coupled with my dedication to undergraduate mentoring will bring a unique perspective to the committee. First, my international experience and collaboration with professionals in the heritage community abroad has made me aware of the potential role SHA can play providing professional development opportunities and assistance to archaeologists in regions with limited resources. Such collaborations would create a forum for promoting this organization’s ethical principles regarding research, reporting, and preservation. My international work and connections will enable me to broaden our reach to underrepresented locals such as the Caribbean and West Africa where many of our members carry out research including collaborative and public outreach programs. Second, my dedication to mentoring students will focus on increasing undergraduate participation in our annual meetings and the organization. This can be accomplished by encouraging candidates that promote student-centered research programs. If, as an organization, we are truly committed to diversity, we must strive to engage with students early in their archaeological career, and ideally they should come from many different places and backgrounds.

If elected to serve SHA, what priorities would you emphasize?

I am a strong advocate for student-centered research that promotes training and public engagement. As part of this, I have sought to provide numerous students with field experience inside and outside of the United States. I have been an instructor and director of numerous field schools in the United States, West Africa, and the Caribbean. I believe that our organization will be stronger if we can attract and provide opportunities for students and professionals from outside the United States. If elected to the Nominations Committee, I would promote candidates to positions that would work to broaden our international appeal and accessibility to students and professionals. I would also encourage those who are interested in expanding the organization’s mentoring programs, specifically those that engage undergraduates to stand for positions within the organization. As a member of the GMAC, I am committed to diversity within the organization in all its forms. This includes expanding our membership to include individuals from around the world and at all stages of their careers in historical archaeology.

 

Edward González-Tennant

Ed Gonzalez-Tennant

Present Position(s):
Visiting Lecturer, Department of Anthropology, University of Central Florida; Principal Investigator, Digital Heritage Interactive, LLC

Education:
Ph.D., Anthropology, University of Florida, 2011
M.A., Anthropology, University of Florida, 2008
M.S., Industrial Archaeology, Michigan Technological University, 2004
B.A., Anthropology, University of Arkansas, 2004

Professional Service to SHA and Other Societies:
SHA: Member, 2003–present; SHA Newsletter Editor—Asia; Member, Technology Committee; Member, Academic and Professional Training Committee; Reviewer, Ed and Judy Jelks Student Travel Award
Register of Professional Archaeologists: Member, 2006–present
Society for American Archaeology: Member, 2005–present
Florida Anthropological Society: Member, 2008–present
International Scientific Committee on Interpretation and Presentation of Cultural Heritage Sites (ICOMOS): VP for Emerging Technologies, 2015–present

Research Interests:
historical archaeology of African and Chinese diasporic communities; collaborative archaeology; public archaeology; digital archaeology; archaeology of race and racialization

Biographical Statement:
I am an anthropological archaeologist with topical interests in the experiences of diasporic peoples in overseas/host society settings. I spent two years in New Zealand researching Chinese Diaspora sites associated with gold mining, and since 2007 I’ve been exploring the experiences of the African Diaspora in Florida and the Caribbean. My other long-term interest explores the potential of information and new media technologies for historical archaeology. This includes 15+ years of working with geographical information systems (GIS) as it specifically relates to our discipline. The use of GIS by historical archaeologists faces unique challenges as we continue to work with material culture, archival evidence, and oral testimony. In addition, I continue to explore the potentials of other digital technologies like virtual reality and digital storytelling. I’ve also organized and led several community-based oral history programs examining the effects of natural disasters, local history, and the African American past. These interests all serve to create and sustain a collaborative archaeology, and ongoing engagements with descendant communities continues to drive my exploration of these technologies. I am fortunate to have explored these interests in both educational and applied settings. I have taught at several universities in the U.S. and abroad, worked in CRM overseeing GIS and digital heritage projects, and consulted on the application of digital technologies relating to the exploration, interpretation, and management of cultural resources by public and private groups.

Given the qualifications and experience outlined in your biographical statement, what do you believe you can contribute to SHA if elected as SHA President-Elect/Board Member?

If elected to the Nominations Committee, I will draw upon my diverse experience to support existing and new connections between SHA and other organizations (e.g., ICOMOS). Such coalition building is vital for protecting heritage resources, a mission that faces new threats in the coming years. This type of work also requires that academic and professional archaeologists find common ground, and I look forward to helping navigate the complex tensions which sometimes arise in this regard. Finally, my work with descendant communities offers an additional voice championing SHA’s ongoing efforts to engage historically underrepresented communities. Learning to listen to the perspectives of others is skill that must be taught and shared. My experience with creating oral history and other community-driven projects has relied on genuinely listening to the experiences of others. This is a primary way of ensuring that our individual interests support those of the public we serve.

If elected to serve SHA, what priorities would you emphasize?

My top priorities are education/training and the continuing diversification of SHA. We need to prioritize skills-based education and identify, highlight, and promote transferrable skills. One solution I’d like to see is a more formal and/or robust mentoring program. Are we doing our members a disservice by not understanding how historical archaeology’s diverse set of skills translate to nontraditional and emerging careers? I think so. Addressing this issue also supports the diversification of SHA. Prioritizing skills that serve a range of career goals will also attract members from underrepresented groups. Emerging technologies and new skills serve innovative forms of public outreach. We need to continue this work and prioritize initiatives that reach across various lines of difference, including age, gender, sexuality, and race. As such, my participation on the Nominations Committee would focus on encouraging candidates who help diversify SHA, both in terms of identity and professional interest. I look forward to helping SHA focus on these and other membership-focused initiatives in the coming years.

 

Christina J. Hodge

Christina Hodge

Present Postion(s):
Academic Curator and Collections Manager, Stanford University Archaeology Collections

Education:
Ph.D., Archaeology, Boston University, 2007
M.A., Archaeological Heritage Management, Boston University, 2000
A.B., Anthropology, Harvard University, 1998

Professional Service to SHA and Other Societies:
Council for Northeast Historical Archaeology: Elected At-large Member, Executive Board, with service on the Subcommittee for Collaborative Preservation and the Recruitment Initiative Subcommittee

Research Interests:
archaeologies of affiliation; intersectional masculinity studies; consumerism; museum anthropology; object-based learning; collaborative and community-based methodologies

Biographical Statement:
I am an historical archaeologist and museum anthropologist focusing on material cultures of affiliation in the colonial world. Commonalities between these realms define my professional practice, which combines social archaeological research; a focus on material culture; community-engaged stewardship; and concern with imparting material literacy and cultural competency through collections-based education. My work as Academic Curator and Collections Manager for the Stanford University Archaeology Collections exemplifies this synergy. I am responsible for daily operations and long-term planning across all areas of collections work, providing expertise, vision, and strategic thinking in collections management, exhibitions, research, outreach, and teaching. I arrived at Stanford after many years in curation, repatriation, university engagement, and community collaboration at Harvard’s Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnography, where I codirected the Harvard Yard Archaeology Project. While there, I also developed courses in repatriation, museum ethics, material history, and archaeological methods. I published Consumerism and the Emergence of the Middle Class in Colonial America in 2014. I am working on several material-culture-based projects on identity, colonialism, consumerism, and the tensions between individual and institutional authority in early America, as well as on the social roles and pedagogical potential of museum collections. I possess a deep, practical understanding of collections-based work through experience with archaeological and ethnographic collections in a university setting. This work shapes my vision for archaeology as a discipline of living collections. Scrupulous, reflexive research can illuminate the resonance and wonder of things while serving contemporary goals of democratization, historic critique, and community visibility.

Given the qualifications and experience outlined in your biographical statement, what do you believe you can contribute to SHA if elected as SHA President-Elect/Board Member?

If elected to the Nominations and Elections Committee, I would serve SHA and its members with a strong background in collections-based professionalism that bridges multiple sites of archaeological endeavor, from field to academy, museum to heritage site. I see the role of historical archaeology as one of social engagement and appreciate projects that make clear contributions to this goal. My work with the Council for Northeastern Historical Archaeology board—especially the Subcommittee for Collaborative Preservation, which educates members about the challenges and opportunities of working with avocationalists—reinforces this perspective. Curatorial collaborations with descendant community members and other stakeholders challenge me to reflect on what archaeologists do, why we do it, and for whom, while teaching ensures I constantly deliberate these questions with my students. I am most directly connected to collections-based research, museum anthropology, and university engagement. But I also bring a broad appreciation of how reflexivity and theory shape archaeological practice.

If elected to serve SHA, what priorities would you emphasize?

If elected, I would emphasize two priority areas of professional practice. The first is the role of historical archaeology as a project of linkage, supporting SHA’s mission of knowledge exchange. Our work can not only link constituencies, such as university students and descendant community members, but also link archaeology with allied realms of anthropology, American and area studies, materials science, digital humanities, and beyond. It’s not just that interdisciplinarity is increasingly important in a post-STEM world. It’s that people have never lived in disciplinary boxes. Some of the most impactful archaeology projects work across specialties to create new understandings. The second area I’d emphasize is archaeology as socially engaged knowledge production. Social engagement may take many forms: correcting damaging historical metanarratives through material cultural research; raising community visibility via collaborative interpretive projects; or simply improving the findability of curated collections for those who may care about them. There are many ways to answer the questions: For whom are we working? And why? The Nominations and Elections Committee is a wonderful space for collaboratively addressing these questions.

 

William A. White, III

Will White

Present Position(s):
Assistant Professor, University of California, Berkeley

Education:
Ph.D., University of Arizona, 2017
M.A., University of Idaho, 2004
B.A., Boise State University, 2001

Professional Service to SHA and Other Societies:
SHA: Member, Academic and Professional Training Committee

Research Interests:
African American archaeology, race and racialization, the American West, digital archaeology 

Biographical Statement:
Historical archaeology forms a connection between the recent past and present communities. Drawing upon our understanding of archaeological method and theory, historical archaeologists have the power to creatively collaborate with communities to help craft the kinds of narratives of the past that do justice to ancestors while providing meaning for communities of today.
I am a cultural resource management archaeologist with over a decade of experience doing fieldwork on prehistoric and historical across the United States from Virginia to California. My research interests include historical artifact analysis; race and racialization; landscape production; and community-based participatory research. I have worked for the Bureau of Applied Research in Anthropology (BARA) at the University of Arizona for the last four years. For BARA, I collaborated with tribal archaeologists in Glacier National Park, created a new historical context for the Theodore Roosevelt National Park, and documented an Indian boarding school for the Blackfeet Tribe.
Taking full advantage of the digital world, I have actively used the internet to disseminate archaeological information since 2012. My blog posts, podcasts, eBooks, and webinars reach between 5,000 and 10,000 people each month. These resources have been created with the goal of improving the careers of new archaeologists, increasing diversity, and bringing archaeology to public audiences.
Since joining the Society for Historical Archaeology in 2002, I have come to realize the strength of this society is its members. We have the potential to take leadership in the ongoing struggle to help reclaim heritage for those who have been omitted from history. If elected to this position, I will do everything in my power to identify and nominate archaeologists who are willing to make this organization an asset for the communities in which we all work.

Given the qualifications and experience outlined in your biographical statement, what do you believe you can contribute to SHA if elected as SHA President-Elect/Board Member?

As a former cultural resource manager, I realize it is more important now than ever to bridge the gap between academic archaeologists and CRMers. The society will benefit most if organizational decisions are made with input from both sides. I will do my best to nominate candidates who understand this.
SHA has taken efforts to address racism, discrimination, and increase diversity. Recent anti-racism advocacy is an excellent first step, but the society needs to move beyond seeking diversity to addressing the concerns of its diverse membership by making anti-racism advocacy part of the society’s mission. While this work is for all SHA members, it can be accelerated by leadership that has internalized an ethos of inclusion and anti-discrimination advocacy.
Public archaeology has done much to make archaeology accessible to communities across the United States, Europe, and Australia. Increasingly, this work has included input from local communities throughout all stages of research.

Increasing the connection between public archaeology and community-based collaboration needs to be another priority of SHA’s leadership.

If elected to serve SHA, what priorities would you emphasize?

If elected to serve on the SHA Nominations Committee, I will work to nominate candidates willing to increase collaboration between archaeologists and communities. Connecting our knowledge, skills, social prestige as scientists with heritage advocacy groups and local communities is important to keeping archaeology relevant to the modern world. SHA is already doing excellent work in this regard and it will be important for the leadership to keep moving in that direction.
Another way of connecting archaeology to communities is by demonstrating how archaeology enhances the suite of heritage conservation tools already in place. Even though it is essential to the place-making process, as currently practiced, CRM archaeology’s contribution to historic preservation is not as tangible as the work of developers, architectural historians, and preservation planners. Archaeology is one source of the narratives that help people attribute meaning to places and themselves. SHA and its leadership could lead the effort to fuse archaeology with the concept of Networked Heritage. Imbedding archaeology into heritage conservation would be another of my priorities.
Finally, I would like to continue SHA’s commitment to diversity, inclusivity, and anti-racism. I have seen this organization progress in this area and would like to nominate candidates interested in continuing this progression.

ACUA BOARD of DIRECTORS

Madeline Fowler

Madeline Fowler

Present Position(s):
Senior Curator Maritime Archaeology, Cultures and Histories Program, Queensland Museum Network, College of Arts, Society and Education, James Cook University
Adjunct Associate Lecturer, Department of Archaeology, Flinders University

Education:
Ph.D., Archaeology, Flinders University, 2015
B.Arch. (Hons), Archaeology, Flinders University, 2012

Professional Service to SHA and Other Societies:
Australasian Institute for Maritime Archaeology: Secretary, 2012–2015; Councilor, 2016–present

Research Interests:
maritime and underwater archaeology; island and coastal archaeology; maritime cultural landscapes and seascapes; promoting diversity within the archaeological discipline; Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander archaeology; community-based research; Indigenous representation and the decolonization of maritime and underwater archaeology; supplementing conventional teaching methods with nontraditional approaches; career paths of young professionals and early-career researchers

Biographical Statement:
My career in archaeology has focused mainly on research and teaching. Undertaking my Ph.D. at Flinders University, I applied a maritime cultural landscape approach while collaborating with the Narungga Aboriginal community at a former mission station to record their postcontact maritime heritage. I have taught a variety of archaeology topics, from first-year classes to postgraduate courses and have supervised on numerous maritime archaeology field schools. My current academic post at James Cook University in Australia’s tropical north involves research, student supervision, and guest teaching. My prior appointment as a marine archaeologist at the UK consultancy, Wessex Archaeology, has provided me with a balanced perspective of the constraints within cultural resource management. In my current position as senior curator maritime archaeology at the Queensland Museum Network, I am gaining significant curatorial, collection management, exhibition, and public programming experience.
I have held a position on the AIMA executive for three years and presently hold a councilor role representing Queensland. I have also notably presented my Australian research at the two most recent SHA conferences and have contributed to ACUA/SHA publications such as the Underwater Archaeology Proceedings and the When the Land Meets the Sea series.

Given your qualifications and experience, what do you believe you can contribute to the ACUA/SHA if elected?

During my doctoral research with the Narungga Aboriginal community in Australia, I developed extensive community-based research experience which particularly examined convergences between Indigenous and maritime archaeology. This included tangible outcomes involving Indigenous peoples in collaborative museum exhibitions, publications, and conference sessions. I could therefore contribute to best-practice advice for ethical maritime archaeology. My well-rounded working background—across academia, consultancy, and museums—would allow me to draw on varied experiences if elected.
As an early-career researcher, currently holding academic positions at two Australian universities, I am uniquely placed in the transitory period between student and professional. This position, in addition to significant undergraduate and postgraduate teaching experience, would allow me to provide applied, real-world advice to support the future generation of underwater archaeologists. My continued involvement with AIMA would also provide a reliable conduit between ACUA/SHA and underwater archaeology activities in Australia.

If elected, what priorities would you emphasize taking into consideration the ACUA and SHA missions and goals, ongoing committee activities, and the management and financial challenges of the Society?

I believe it is critical to stress the ACUA and SHA’s missions to strive towards diversity, both within the ACUA/SHA bodies and within the field of underwater archaeology. I am particularly keen to see Indigenous peoples and young professionals (students and early-career researchers) actively engaged in the activities of the ACUA. I would like to see these opportunities formalized through targeted projects and programs to extend the current efforts made by the ACUA and SHA in this area. Having experienced firsthand the mentorship of female role models on the ACUA board, I believe recruiting, mentoring, facilitating, and promoting the organizations members is critical. As an international advisory body, a collaborative effort to become more socially relevant is best accomplished through partnerships. If elected, I would endeavor to encourage existing and new sustainable networks.

 

Ryan Harris

Ryan Harris

Current Position(s):
Senior Underwater Archaeologist, Underwater Archaeology Team, Parks Canada, Archaeology and History Branch (2008–present)

Education:
M.A., Maritime History and Nautical Archaeology, East Carolina University, 2007
B.A. (Honours), Anthropology – Specialist Archaeology, University of Toronto, 1995

Professional Service:
Nautical Archaeology Society Tutor; Co-editor with Babits, Lawrence E. and Cathy Fach of Underwater Archaeology: Proceedings of the 31st Annual Society for Historical Archaeology Conference (1998)

Research Interests:
underwater archaeology of 19th-century British polar exploration, historic ship architecture, the archaeology of small craft, remote-sensing applications in underwater archaeology, 3-D site modeling with underwater laser scanners and multibeam echosounders

Given the qualifications and experience outlined in your biographical statement, what do you believe you can contribute if elected to ACUA?

For the past 19 years, I have worked as a field archaeologist and project manager for Parks Canada’s Underwater Archaeology Team, which operates all over Canada in the many National Parks, National Historic Sites, and National Marine Conservation Areas across the country. This has afforded me the opportunity to develop a suitable breadth of experience in diverse aspects of cultural resource management and the practice of underwater archaeology.

More recently, I have served as the project manager for the successful search and ongoing archaeological study of the lost ships of the ill-fated Sir John Franklin expedition of 1845. This large-scale, complex, and multiyear project has involved extensive multidisciplinary collaborative research, engaging a variety of public-, private-, and academic-sector partners. In the process, I have enjoyed the privilege of working directly with indigenous communities in project-development efforts in the context of the collaborative management of a high-profile, nationally and internationally significant marine archaeological site. In addition, this project has continually attracted extensive media attention worldwide, and our organization has exerted considerable effort in sharing this story through a variety of public outreach venues. I believe that this depth of experience would help me make a meaningful contribution to the ACUA in bringing an outlook that is inclusive and collaborative in nature, and that is focused on safeguarding our submerged cultural heritage through concrete practical archaeological action, but even more so through active engagement of vested stakeholder interest and raised public awareness.

If elected to serve ACUA, what priorities would you emphasize, taking into account SHA and ACUA’s missions and goals, ongoing committee activities, and the management and financial challenges of the Society?

If elected to serve the ACUA, I would work in support of some of the existing challenges that continue to confront the organization, for example the ongoing need to promote sound ethics in underwater archaeology, to engage students and young professionals in the discipline and to encourage them to become active members of SHA, and to further the adoption and observation of the UNESCO Convention on the Protection of Underwater Cultural Heritage. In addition to these existing priorities, I would personally advocate for the need for the ACUA to further engage in several issues that I have witnessed firsthand during Parks Canada’s recent projects in the Arctic. First, would be the need for increased collaborative work with indigenous communities to protect and present our shared cultural heritage while at the same time encouraging sustainable tourism opportunities in support of, in this case, Northern community development. Second, would be the pressing need to address the impacts of climate change on shoreline and inundated archaeological sites, some of which are extremely vulnerable given their exposed location.

Sarah E. Holland

Sarah Holland

Present Position(s):
Principal Investigator, Gray & Pape, Inc.

Education:
Ph.D., Maritime Archaeology, University of Southampton
M.Sc., Maritime Archaeology, University of Southampton
B.A., Northern Kentucky University

Professional Service to SHA and Other Societies:
Australasian Institute for Maritime Archaeology: Editorial Board Member, 2014–present; Nautical Archaeology Society: Elected Member of Executive Committee, 2002–2005, Chair of the Outreach and Education Committee, 2005–2007, Publications Committee Member, 2004–2006; Society for Historical Archaeology: Inter-Society Relations Committee member, 2004–2007

Research Interests:
site formation processes and the application of related analyses to site management; use of legacy data to gain new understanding of sites and an appreciation for the evolution of maritime archaeology methodologies; public outreach, engagement, and education as a critical component of ongoing site management; development of inclusive interpretive programs; bringing understanding of maritime sites to a wider audience

Biographical Statement:
My passion for ships, maritime and coastal history, and the sea was born out of a childhood spent on pleasure boats of the Ohio River and summers on North Carolina beaches. Since my high school days using copies of the National Geographic to write papers on underwater archaeology for history class, I have been drawn to archaeology (both terrestrial and maritime) and to shipwrecks of all eras, and have pursued a lifelong fascination with the underwater world. Since those early days, I have worked for more than 15 years in cultural resource management and maritime archaeology in the United States and England, either in a professional role or as a student while in graduate school. This transatlantic experience has given me a deep understanding for the public appreciation of archaeology and, the particular allure of shipwrecks and other maritime archaeological sites. Bringing this underwater world to a wider audience is my goal in every aspect of my professional life.

While pursuing graduate education in England, I worked closely with not-for-profit organizations managing shipwreck sites, and assisted in public outreach programs allowing divers and avocational archaeologists to have access to protected wreck sites. This included the development and promotion of shipwreck diver trails, public meetings, and lectures; and the publication of materials for the public regarding protected shipwreck sites. During that time, I was closely involved with the Nautical Archaeology Society as a member of the Education and Outreach Committee, the Publications Committee, and the Executive Committee, roles that I have missed in recent years due to returning to the U.S. to focus on finishing my Ph.D.
Having completed my graduate studies, I am delighted to finally have the opportunity to become more involved with SHA and I look forward to the opportunity to serve on the ACUA Board.

Given your qualifications and experience, what do you believe you can contribute to the ACUA/SHA if elected?

It is no exaggeration to say that I have been fascinated by shipwreck sites since high school. I believe that one of the key ways I can contribute to the ACUA is by channeling that passion and using my communication skills to share that excitement with others. My past work with the NAS, the Hampshire and Wight Trust for Maritime Archaeology, avocational dive groups, and site management organizations (such as English Heritage), has given me the opportunity in the past to work with numerous and varied groups interested in the preservation, interpretation, and dissemination of information regarding shipwreck sites. The energy and drive that I have for this work is in need of an outlet! Channeling this passion for shipwrecks and other maritime sites into concrete work on this side of the Atlantic has been a long-time goal of mine, which I believe could be an enormous asset for the ACUA/SHA.
Additionally, having worked for a number of years in academic textbook publishing, and in my current role as Technical Editor/Principal Investigator at Gray & Pape, Inc., I believe that one of my greatest assets is my understanding of the requirements for disseminating research results and analysis to a wider audience through a variety of venues and for a range of audiences. Accurate narrative in clear language is important to any publication, in any medium. This can be particularly important for most audiences, since many types of archaeological reporting aren’t always easily approachable for non-archaeologists. It is important to strike a balance between presenting technical results and writing/presenting for non-technical audiences when seeking innovative ways to engage with the wider public, another one of my key interests.

If elected, what priorities would you emphasize, taking into consideration the ACUA and SHA missions and goals, ongoing committee activities, and the management and financial challenges of the Society?

As previously mentioned, my deep interest in outreach and engagement with the public—including divers, avocational archaeologists, and interested members of the public—would definitely be a priority, if elected. I believe that it is through engagement with members of local communities outside of the professional and academic archaeological spheres, that archaeologists can find their strongest advocates for the ongoing preservation and interpretation of archaeological sites. Creating champions and protectors of underwater cultural heritage through active engagement and education would be of primary interest to me.
Of course, by its very nature, outreach and engagement with the various stakeholders interested in a site relies upon the physical preservation, documentation, and going management of these archaeological sites. My research into site formation processes and the varied approaches for ongoing site management of sites would continue to be a focus. The need to disseminate such research in broad ways to multiple audiences is a challenge that I would welcome and would be a priority during my tenure on the ACUA board. The need to include the public in understanding site formation processes, and how humans and nature directly impact maritime sites, would be a specific direction for outreach and public engagement. I believe that this, in particular, would encourage close collaboration with other members of the ACUA/SHA and with their relevant committees in order to preserve maritime sites for future generations.
Lastly, my experience both in cultural resource management and textbook publishing has given me a solid experience in the challenges of timetables and budgets. All professional societies come with their own set of budgetary and administrative constraints, something learned during my time working on NAS committees. Understanding these constraints and working as a team member to produce the highest quality publications, outreach programs, and innovative means of public engagement would be a final priority.

Jennifer McKinnon, Ph.D.

Jennifer McKinnon

Present Position(s):
Associate Professor, East Carolina University, Program in Maritime Studies

Education:
Ph.D., Anthropology, Florida State UniversityM.A., Anthropology, Florida State University
B.A., Anthropology, University of Florida

Professional Service to SHA and Other Societies:
SHA: Public Education and Interpretation Committee, 2014–present and SHA UNESCO Committee, 2014–present; ACUA: Institutional Associate Member Representative for Australasian Institute for Maritime Archaeology, 2011–present; ACUA Committees: ACUA Job Market Survey, Development Committee, UNESCO Committee; AIMA: President, 2011–2013, Councilor, 2006–present; South Australia Heritage Council, 2011–2013

Research Interests:
Spanish colonial archaeology in Southeastern U.S. and Pacific; U.S. Life-Saving Service history and archaeology; conflict archaeology and WWII in the Pacific; landscape and seascape theoretical contributions; digital humanities in research, teaching, learning, and communication; Indigenous maritime cultural landscapes and seascapes; cultural heritage management, public outreach and interpretation, and heritage tourism

Biographical Statement:
For the past 20 years, I’ve been involved in both terrestrial and maritime archaeological work and research in both a management-based position at the Florida Bureau of Archaeological Research and in higher education at Flinders University (Australia) and now East Carolina University (U.S.). My experience in these positions as well as working in the U.S. and overseas has given me an appreciation for how wide-ranging our field of underwater archaeology and the management and preservation of underwater cultural heritage can be. I have held positions on advisory boards including the South Australia Heritage Council and elected positions including President of the Australasian Institute for Maritime Archaeology. My Research Associate position with Ships of Exploration and Discovery, Inc. has provided me with an understanding of nonprofit research and grant writing.

Given your qualifications and experience, what do you believe you can contribute to the ACUA/SHA if elected?

I believe my experience in academia both in the U.S. and Australia is beneficial to ACUA as it brings a perspective that compliments the existing agency, nonprofit, museum, and consulting experience of the board. Additionally, my experience with nonprofit organizations and elected positions on heritage boards and organizations allows me to bring an understanding of multiple organizational structures to the board.

If elected, what priorities would you emphasize taking into consideration the ACUA and SHA missions and goals, ongoing committee activities, and the management and financial challenges of the Society?

As an existing ACUA Institutional Associate Member Representative for the Australasian Institute for Maritime Archaeology, I am serving on multiple ACUA committees including: the ACUA Job Market Survey, Development Committee, and UNESCO Committee. I would continue to serve in these roles on the committees. I’m particularly interested in the future of education in underwater archaeology and would endeavor to continue examining how we might better prepare our future generations of underwater archaeologists for the job market.
A second priority I have is activism in the protection of underwater cultural heritage and the legislation that protects it. As such, I would continue to and increase my involvement in campaigns to ensure this heritage is protected from the local to the global level, be it city ordinances or international conventions. I feel strongly that we should be engaging our political representatives and the general public on a regular basis, so that they understand the importance of protecting our shared underwater heritage.

 

Eric Swanson

Eric Swanson

Present Position(s):
Marine Archaeologist; Geoscientist

Education:
M.A., Historical Archaeology/Anthropology, University of West Florida
B.A., Anthropology, Georgia Southern University

Professional Service to SHA and Other Societies:
SHA: UNESCO Committee, Technology Committee, Development Committee; Hydrographic Society of America Member

Research Interests:
development and utilization of deepwater technology to investigate remote archaeological sites; the use of geophysical survey technology to survey navigable waterways; utilizing new methods for passive sensors in archaeology; advocating nondestructive techniques to investigating archaeological sites; discovering prehistoric archaeological sites along the outer continental shelf; building partnerships and technological understanding across multiple scientific disciplines; innovative interpretive methods

Biographical Statement:
I have spent the last nine years growing my experience with maritime archaeology ranging from examining environments in Alaska, the Gulf of Mexico, the Atlantic Ocean, Nigeria, and the Indian Ocean. Through various programs, I have learned several methods of investigating submerged archaeological landscapes and sites by hand and foot. From that point, I began to work with remote sensing and geophysical investigations of archaeological sites and development hazards. Growing my knowledge of the physics, chemistry, and geology that surrounds submerged archaeological sites, I’ve learned methods of utilizing new tools and techniques to investigate remotely submerged areas. These skills have grown beyond just interpretive techniques on studying and identifying shipwrecks and other submerged archaeological sites, into identifying predictive spatial models and using historical data to identify patterns on a much larger scale. The combination of using GIS technology, accurate field sensors, and understanding the science associated beyond the material of archaeological sites has developed an appreciation for the field that I would like to continue to explore into the future. With these tools, I hope we can continue to gain the ability to better define, study, and protect our world’s cultural heritage.

Given your qualifications and experience, what do you believe you can contribute to the ACUA/SHA if elected?

I believe that with my driven momentum in exploring identifying international cultural resources, technology, and nondestructive survey techniques is beneficial to the ACUA/SHA. With my past experience working in remote countries, or with previously unexplored data, I have seen that important cultural resources remain overlooked on a broad scale, and these areas should receive emphasized focus from research groups outside of heavily researched regions. This ensures that a global demand for cultural resource protection can be brought to the table in areas where people struggle to identify or understand their past.
My direction into the use of technology has enlightened me into meet new alternatives to mapping and presenting information to the public, and I feel that my exploration into other sciences can aid in building the use of alternative techniques in archaeological investigations. I believe that nondestructive techniques and a continued emphasis on innovating the way we survey, process, and interpret data can lead to more in-depth analytical capabilities in the field, and that we may decrease the amount of “discarding” that occurs in the field. More focus on these concerns may help to prevent future site destruction in the effort of conservation.

Interactive techniques in modeling and presentation may help to prevent unnecessary site destruction and cultural resource destruction by emphasizing the need to approach subjects with as many nondestructive techniques as possible before dissecting and discarding resources for final material documentation.

If elected, what priorities would you emphasize taking into consideration the ACUA and SHA missions and goals, ongoing committee activities, and the management and financial challenges of the Society?

My priorities for taking leadership and representative positions rest on the foundation of protecting our material and undocumented past. I would like to continue to facilitate communication and partnership across academic, public, private, and government sectors. As someone who is active within the private sector, I believe that building trust and cooperation between all parties is essential to guiding a balance in the field. I will continue to build as many relationships with this objective as possible. I will approach the ACUA/SHA with the goal of embodying the values associated with exploring the human past with the perspective that the ends do not strictly justify the means, and that it takes cooperative structural agreements and support from the majority to protect our human past.
Having regular communication with groups who are not traditionally educated or knowledgeable of the effect of their activity on cultural resources, I find that open education is valuable in helping to garner support from the least likely of sources. These relationships can build into partnerships and innovate protection of cultural resources.
Continued discourse and the elimination of harassment, intimidation, and discriminatory practices is essential to opening the field to a broader range of audiences. Through making every possible option available to every person, we can normalize the value of needing all individuals to succeed without distraction from fear, abatement, or insecurity. With the success of all people coming from effort and merit, and not from repression, a positive growth of science will pave the way for more social, academic, and financial opportunities in the field.
With continuing support for assisting education and cultural heritage protection, financial challenges may be addressed with donations or funding acquired from private industry. Opening increased dialog to companies willing to sponsor events or showcase their technology and scientific systems may aid in increasing the financial reach of educating individuals who may not have an opportunity to build upon the success of cultural heritage awareness and protection. Increasing visibility and emphasizing the value of financial support to the public may help to meet the challenges that face funding an academic society.

Andrew Weir, RPA

Andy Weir

Present Position:
President, Commonwealth Heritage Group, Inc.

Education:
M.A., Maritime History, East Carolina University
B.A., Anthropology, Western Michigan University

Professional Service to SHA and Other Societies:
American Cultural Resources Association: Elected Board Member, 2009–2012, 2012–2015; Conference Committee, Member, 2009–present; Headquarters Oversight Committee, Chair, 2015–Present; Revenue Generating Task Force, Chair, 2009–2015, Administrative Challenges Task Force, Chair, 2013–2015, Education Committee, Member, 2012–present, Strategic Planning Task Force, 2012; Leaders in Energy and Preservation (coalition of energy companies and historic preservation groups supporting efficient energy exploration and advancing heritage management): Elected Board Member, 2016–present

Research Interests:
integrating public involvement, technology, and thoughtful development within the realm of heritage resource management

Biographical Statement:
My love affair with underwater archaeology and maritime history began when I was dragged to SHA meetings as a teenager. I liked going to cities and place I have never been to, but, man, where most of those presentations boring, at least to a teenager. Except the ones about shipwrecks and underwater sites. That experience lit a spark in me that led to pursuing an advanced degree in maritime history and still to some extant drives my professional life. Unfortunately, my professional career led me away from fully being able to delve into the world of underwater archaeology. I do, however, get to enjoy it through the maritime-related projects my company has. That said, I feel like I have strengths and abilities that the council could really benefit from. One of the driving principals in my life, and one that I try very hard to instill in all my employees, is that of giving back and contributing to the greater good. One of the best ways to do that in the archaeological world is to get involved with professional organizations, be it presenting papers, sitting on committees, taking a leadership role … My skills lie with organization leadership and strategic planning with an eye to implementing the strategies and I think I could be a real help to the council.

Given your qualifications and experience, what do you believe you can contribute to the ACUA/SHA if elected?

Being the owner and President of a successful nationwide cultural heritage firm, I believe I can bring leadership and practical problem solving abilities to the council. Also, through my experience sitting on the Board of Directors for other professional organizations, I will bring an understanding of how to leverage the abilities within the council to effect changes that are aligned with the council’s vision. Finally, I bring a passion and a desire to contribute to the field of maritime heritage and underwater archaeology.

If elected, what priorities would you emphasize taking into consideration the ACUA and SHA missions and goals, ongoing committee activities, and the management and financial challenges of the Society?

I would like to see more engagement from the ACUA and SHA with professionals working in archaeology and heritage management who are employed by private companies. I would also like to see more engagement from these professionals with ACUA and SHA. Not only will this likely increase the membership in SHA, which, in turn, will provide more financial resources for the organization, it will also help provide the greater archaeological community more access to the data and information collected from the “grey literature.” All too often, vital information collected during heritage management projects is processed, analyzed, and put on a shelf somewhere, possibly never to be looked at again. This does a disservice to the resource and the greater professional community.
I would also like to see the ACUA and SHA have more outreach with federal agencies. After being in the heritage management industry for over 20 years, I feel most federal agencies do a poor job taking into account underwater and maritime resources when planning their undertakings. I think is largely an issue of awareness and the only way to raise awareness is through engagement.
Finally, I would like to help further the advocacy agenda of the ACUA and SHA. Given the current political climate, I feel like we have an all-hands-on-deck type of situation (forgive my maritime pun) and we need everybody with the ability and the experience to be working towards our shared agenda. Through my company and my involvement with other professional organizations, I have substantial advocacy experience and would like to apply that knowledge and experience to the council.